Ntiva Live: Apple for Business

Employee Productivity Resources

Episode Overview

Today, Ben and Ross talk about Mac-based employee productivity resources, and how they can help your business!

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Episode Transcript - Employee Productivity Resources

Ben:

Hi everyone. Today is Tuesday, November... No, I have to look, 16th. November 16th, 2021, livestreaming from Chicago. I'm Ben Griner, Director of Apple Technology at Ntiva. With me today is Ross Matsuda, our Systems Administrator focused on Apple Technology, and today, we're discussing employee resources to be productive and self-sufficient.And, I have a screen here that says that. Yes.

Ben:

And before we get into that, let's address the news, Apple news, because that's always where we want to start. So, macOS Monterey, Ross, I know this came out a couple weeks ago. You and I are running it. Most of our team is running it. We're not actively recommending it, yet, to our clients, and maybe you could explain why that is, and when we might expect to be recommending it.

Ross:

Yeah, no, absolutely. Generally speaking, the way that I like to refer to Monterey at this moment is supported but not recommended. So if you're picking up new hardware, if you're getting one of the new 14-inch MacBook Pros, it shows up, it's got Monterey on it, we can support the system, right? So we can enroll it, we can help you manage the device. That's all fine.

Ross:

This is still the initial release, so 12.0.1 is the current version of Monterey, and that's the version that's shipped to consumers. We, generally, at minimum, we tend to recommend that people sort of steer clear until the first major update. And so that, for Monterey, will be OS 12.1. That's currently in its second beta for those were beta-testing it, and so, we're just hoping for that to be released some point in the near future. We'll vet it, make sure everything looks good, but with a pretty decent degree of frequency, that initial 0.1 update is going to hammer out a lot of bugs and things that may have may have made it through during the initial push.

Ross:

That being said, yes, 12.0.1 has been very stable, and most of the users I've spoken to, and myself personally, have had really positive experiences with it. But unless there is an explicit business-critical need to be running Monterey, I would still recommend sort of sitting tight for until, at the absolute least, until that first patch comes out, 12.1. And, generally speaking, we're going to be doing a much bigger push for adoption. Excuse me, probably in late January, early February. We like to give it about 90 days for all the other developers to catch up and make sure that third party plugins, any apps they've got, are really taking advantage of, and our compatible with the software, just to play it safe.

Ben:

Did my video just go wonky?

Ross:

Yeah, yeah. They're very, very blurry object right now.

Ben:

My phone just went to sleep, I guess. I'm using my phone as a camera.

Ross:

Oh, interesting. Never tried that.

Ben:

Okay, we're back. Yeah. Apple surprised us with... Normally, it would be version 12, right? But they immediately dropped 12.0.1. So we're kind of waiting for the next update. But, so far, the experience I've had has been really good, with the exception of that older Mac mini we have, which lost Bluetooth. And I was kind of hoping the next update would fix that. We haven't seen that yet.

Ben:

But, yeah, as Ross mentioned, don't rush into it if you only have one machine, and that's your primary work machine, but if you have a spare machine or a test machine, certainly, install Monterey, or work with us. We have tools to help you install it. And, in fact, I want to talk a little bit about this, because this continually comes up again, and again, and again.

Ben:

And I'm losing video again, so I'm going to give up on that. I don't know why it works as long as it has, and then it stopped. Let me just change my video. Built-in, there we go.

Ross:

Hey.

Ben:

Okay. So this comes up again and again, and it is super-confusing, right? Apple puts out an upgrade, and if you're already up-to-date, this is what you're going to see. But, if you're not, you're going to see this upgrade now, which Ross, I know we've had some hit-and-miss success in the past hiding this from people, but most recently, not success, right?

Ross:

Yeah. It is a surprisingly difficult thing to do. And that's because there used to be a very reliable way to do this using the command line, and using the software update binary. That was officially deprecated, starting in Big Sur. And so we have to have separate installation logic for the... we call them banner blockers, right? Because this is a Mac OS upgrade banner in system preferences, what we're talking about. And so we've got a relatively stable way to do that in Catalina and earlier, 10.15, and earlier. And then, starting in Big Sur, they added a different control mechanism for it that's pushed via MDM profile, and has a maximum length it can exist for, and that is 90 days. After 90 days from launch of Monterey, there is literally no mechanism to have the Mac stop presenting this upgrade banner.

Ross:

Furthermore, the banner blocker that they allowed, that Apple created as this MDM profile actually doesn't work on early versions of Big Sur. So if you've got Big Sur 11.0 between 11.2, .3, there's literally nothing you can do to hide it. It simply can't be done. So the mechanism they created only started working in 11.3.

Ben:

So, long story short, we would love to block this. We can't always do it. And the problem is when we encourage people to restart their machine, they naturally, because Apple sends them here, they naturally are gravitating towards this big, top Upgrade Now button. When, in fact, what we need them to focus on is this More Info link hidden down here, which has additional patches for the operating system that they're on, not the upgrade.

Ben:

And this has caused frustration and confusion, and people telling us we don't know how to do our jobs. And it's all because Apple used to separate upgrades from updates. They combined them, it's right here. They are doing a great job of getting people to upgrade. But in the real world, in the business world, we don't always want to upgrade right away. So, we're not encouraging people to upgrade. And in fact, some people, if they were to hit the upgrade button, although we are blocking it, they will eventually get to a point where it will fail. But if we were not blocking it, they would essentially bring down their machine for a good couple hours, I would say. I mean, in my experience of installing Monterey, that is the one thing, that it did take a quite a long time to prep and install. And I could not use my computer during that time. Fair to say, Ross, or am I exaggerating?

Ross:

No, that's pretty much that. The upgrade took my 16-inch MacBook Pro... it was not quite 90 minutes, but it took a while. It was a big file to prepare. And, especially, for Apple Silicon devices, obviously, you know it's crazy horsepower. They can do this much more quickly, but the order of operations is also slightly different, where now, just like in iOS, the devices are trying to do much more heavy lifting for the OS upgrade before it restarts. So that can feel kind of disorienting, too. Where that first preparatory phase, before the machine restarts, now feels much longer because it's trying to do more earlier on.

Ben:

Yeah.

Ross:

And then only reboot really when it has to.

Ben:

I've also seen... I came back to my computer, if I'm remembering correctly, and I felt like it was done and ready for me to log in. And then I logged in, and it was like 15 to 20 minutes remaining. So now, you got to wait for that first login to take some time.

Ross:

Yeah, funny story. If the computer has to restart in order to process a second phase of an upgrade, and your computer file vault's encrypted, it reboots, and then your disc is locked and it can't proceed until you decrypt it. And so that's that pause that you're seeing there. We see that all the time, and especially, that means for upgrades on headless machines like servers, if they're encrypted, it's really important to make sure that someone has physical access to decrypt the thing, so it can keep doing its job, keep doing what it needs to.

Ben:

Yeah, okay. So I hate to beat a dead horse, so to speak, but that's what we've got to do when it comes to communication. And one other bit of news, you mentioned it, Ross, so I want to mention it. There's an article on nine to 9to5Mac about, here's why Twitter, Uber, and more, are giving fully-loaded M1 MacBook Pros to engineers. And the summary of the article is that these machines are so powerful that the engineers, who are doing a lot of development work, and need to compile things, can just compile things so much more swiftly when they're on these M1s.

Ben:

And, of course, I know we don't all have the deep pockets of Twitter and Uber, and these high-end machines do cost more money, but their argument was it's saving them money because the engineers and developers are not spending as much time waiting for their development to process. I might have interchange some verbiage there, but think you get the idea.

Ross:

Yeah, absolutely. I actually went to the Apple Store on Sunday, and got my hands on one of these just to take a look at it. The housing feels remarkably like the old Titanium PowerBooks, remember those?

Ben:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ross:

Really slick. I like it. And, one last thought on this software update thing.

Ben:

Yeah.

Ross:

If you're working with any of your users about this process, take a look at that. Yes, the More Info button's what we want users to click, but right above that is the really key text, other updates, not upgrades, but other updates are available. And so that's the indicator that someone's sleuthing in the right direction to try to find that button to click.

Ben:

Yeah. And, as always, reach out to us if you have any questions.

Ben:

Okay, let's get into Employee Resources to Be Productive & Self-Sufficient, and why I think this is so important is because, how many of us wake up in the morning and think, "I can't wait to reach out for support today?" On anything, right? It's just human nature that we don't necessarily enjoy... most of us, I know I don't. Ross, I don't know about you. I mean, even when I know there's somebody who can help me, it's not like I always look forward to reaching out for help. Because I just... maybe I'm broken. But, I feel like I will first attempt to see if there's something I can do, excuse me, to either learn or alleviate the situation.

Ben:

Obviously, there are things like, we're having our bathrooms redone. I personally would never attempt to redo my bathroom, excuse me. So I bring in the professional for that. But simple plumbing fixes, I might attempt. Anything major that requires dismantling a tube. I'm like, "Yeah, that's probably not a good idea." So, it's the same with IT, right? People want to be self-sufficient. We want to give them the tools to be self-sufficient, if they want to take advantage of it.

Ben:

And for us, I think the jumping off point is really Support Menu, and everyone who is on Big Sur 12 or, now, Monterey, would see Support Menu up here in the Menu bar. Now, we had a previous iteration of Support Menu that ran in older operating systems, but it was taking a lot of resources to keep that up to date and developed as Apple continued to make changes. So we changed to a new format, but that requires a newer operating system. So if you're not yet to... I'm getting the numbers confused, 11, it goes to 11.

Ross:

Yeah.

Ben:

If you're still on 10.15... is 10.15 the last one? No, it's [crosstalk 00:12:54]. Okay, 10.15. If you're still on 10.15, you're not going to see this, but today we know we want to get people on Big Sur, and eventually want to get them on Monterey. So the good news is Support Menu. You still have access to all these resources. You just may not have the easy button that I'm showing you here.

Ben:

And what I want to focus on, first of all, is MacManage, because everyone does have MacManage. And you can launch it from here. You could also go into your Applications folder under Mac, Manage, and open it from here. And this is a self-service application. In fact, it used to be called Self Service, and then we switched platforms. It's now called MacManage. You can search, you can browse, you can install. You do not have to be an admin. These are all vetted, verified, safe things to run on your computer. And, in fact, you may see things different than what I see, because you may be in a different policy that either shows you more or shows you less, based on your environment. Is that fair to say, Ross? I mean...

Ross:

Yeah, absolutely [crosstalk 00:14:11]. We curate a pretty large software library in here, and you can see Ben just clicked on the Categories button. We've got a lot of different types of actions. The most common thing you'll see in a self-service environment like this is just going to be app installations, right? So if a user says, "Oh, I really need to download Spotify," they can go in here, find it, and it's version that we've confirmed is operational. I did not make that live yet.

Ben:

Oh, shit. Okay.

Ross:

I just finished writing that yesterday for one of our clients. So that'll be going live in the Library soon, but Adobe Acrobat Reader should be live at the moment. But this just allows you to quickly find an app, one button, you click it, it installs itself, and the installation is run by the MacManage process, which has administrative access.

Ross:

So this is a great tool for optional installations for your users who are running as standard accounts. But just installing things is kind of the tip of the iceberg, because this tool lets us also run scripts and other main maintenance actions, it includes the ability to do links. So here, you can see we've got things for rebuilding Spotlight. We have a temporary admin promotion script in here called Grant Me Admin Access. This is a really powerful tool that allows for the temporary promotion of an account to an administrator. That is only deployed on a per-organization basis because, obviously, it's a very powerful tool. We need to make sure everyone's on the same page before we deploy it.

Ross:

Then, other things are less interesting. A quick database repair for Universal Type Clients or some scripts to help out if there's any trouble with firewall. So we can allow users to just jump in here and run these sorts of scripts. There's also a link to our forms. If you, as a primary contact working with us, need to let us know about some upcoming changes, you can just, really fast, jump into those, and it'll launch in your web browser.

Ross:

We also have some scripts that are built for user configuration. So, yeah, here's the hello goodbye form for new onboardings and terminations and all that jazz.

Ben:

What was the last thing you said, Ross?

Ross:

Oh, user configuration.

Ben:

Oh, yeah.

Ross:

So this one... just built these to sort of have this tool in place. Some people love it. A lot of users are just never going to see it. This allows you to, just with one click, change the default apps that are used for different things on your computer. The most common one that we have requested is changing your default email app, right? So we built ones to either set that to Outlook or to Apple Mail. That's just a one-click, it'll take care of it in the background for you, and lock that in.

Ross:

We have PDF readers. If you want to use Preview or Adobe Reader, we have a one-click button on the left there that changes you to using Pages, Numbers and Keynote, instead of Word Excel and PowerPoint, things like that. And, of course, your browsers, as well.

Ross:

So this is just a sampling of the items that we try to make available to users for this sort of self- remediation.

Ben:

Yeah. And certainly, some people will use this, and participate, and try things. Others will just... maybe they reach out to us. And we'll say, "We'll launch this app to run this thing," explaining why we want them to do that. And that just makes it faster and easier, so we don't have to jump on the machine, and run it for them. And, yeah, these are some very popular ones that we... when we get lots of requests and if we can make it easier, we'll build it, and put it in here. So if you have ideas of what we can put in here, please let us know.

Ben:

Let's see, is there anything else maintenance? I will just caution... maintenance stuff, probably, although it is safe to run, it's also probably a waste of time unless you know exactly what it's doing.

Ross:

Well said.

Ben:

Yeah. So these are probably good to run only if we suggest it. Or, if we've suggested it before, and you know it worked, certainly give it a try. I just want to caution that if you're running something like this too often, let us know. I remember way back when I showed somebody how to do a maintenance script, thinking that this was like a once-a-year thing. And I learned that they were running it every morning because they thought that that was a good thing to do. And I'm like, "Well, it probably didn't hurt anything, but it certainly was a waste of time." So don't think that you should have to run these very often.

Ben:

So, yeah. Let's see, anything else we want to talk about here, Ross? I see we have Chat, but are we using Chat? Have we tried that?

Ross:

I've... some of our technicians, yes. And, it'll, pop up in a separate MacManage window, and then you'll have your chat logs here, as well.

Ben:

So we have to initiate Chat with a client. They can't just initiate it here.

Ross:

Correct.

Ben:

Okay.

Ross:

Because this will be... if a user sets up an appointment with one of our technicians, they'll reach out, and say, "Hey, let's get to work. Is now still a good time?" You'll get connected, and then sort of off to the races.

Ben:

Okay.

Ben:

Great. Well, speaking of Chat, or talking to an agent... we'll skip over Help Center for just a minute. The bottom row here, which is also different, based on your support region, meaning if you get support from the Midwest, and, in fact, if you get support from Forget Legacy, Forget Computers versus Legacy 3Points, we are still working on building a standard support platform at Ntiva that we all live in that is actively in progress. But until then, you're going to see some variations here. So your phone number will be different than mine. Your new case, which is going to open up an email, will be different than mine, And Book Appointment may not even be an option for you today. If it is, great, you can take advantage of it. If not, maybe we can build that in the future. These are all things that we're trying to work toward, is to make it easier for everyone, clients and ourselves, to deliver that service.

Ben:

So let's go back to Help Center because that's another area that... in fact, if I hit Help Center, it's going to dump me into our support center, because I'm an admin, and I'm logged in, But if you hit Help Center, it's going to dump you into Ntiva's Apple Help Center. And this is a Knowledge Base that has articles now, going back at least 11 years. I mean, I looked at an article the other day, still relevant, 11 years later. It needs a little up updating, a couple links were broken, but there's a bunch of information here. Maybe some of it is outdated, but we are continually adding to it, on a monthly basis. So certainly, this is a great resource, and we get a lot of hits from the greater internet on here, as well. And these were built primarily on our support desk questions. Ross and I will get questions that we need to articulate, and a blog post isn't always appropriate, so we put it in the Knowledge Base. And a good example of that is what we talked about earlier, these Nudge notifications.

Ben:

So Nudge notifications are nudging your employees to run the patches that require a restart, and doing so on their time, when it's convenient for them. So Ross just updated these screen grabs. In fact, our new screen grab, which we showed you earlier... it's kind of hard to see here, but we put the big red X there because too many people were ignoring the little arrow, and they still were jumping up to the top. Is that going to solve it? I don't know, but we're trying, so...

Ross:

Every little bit helps.

Ben:

Yeah. So we've got Knowledge Base articles, and then we do have, at https://www.ntiva.com... whoops. Wrong window. At https://www.ntiva.com, there is a resource page where we have press releases, live events, whitepapers, blog posts, our Apple livestream is also here, as well. And we fixed the historical information, so now if you go down here at past livestreams, which, by the way, I still need that button to be moved over, and centered properly. But if you go to past livestreams, you'll see all of them here. So that's a great resource. So lots of information regarding doing things yourself, with applications or configurations, resources online, and then how to contact us.

Ben:

The information up at the top, it's a quick reference point. We have this information in Visionbot. If you do see a little bullet up here, a little red circle, that means you have an update. Right, Ross?

Ross:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah, this is going to [crosstalk 00:23:29]. There's three different things that can badge up there.

Ben:

Oh, okay.

Ross:

When you're looking at Support Menu, the items for your operating system. So in the top right, where it says Mac OS Monterey, that can badge if there is an available software update for your Mac. Not an upgrade.

Ben:

Okay.

Ross:

Thankfully, just an update.

Ben:

An update, yeah.

Ross:

The Last Reboot option, second row on the left, that is going to badge if your computer's gone longer than 30 days without restarting.

Ben:

Okay.

Ross:

Just to give you a little [crosstalk 00:23:55], "Hey, it's probably about time"-

Ben:

And, if I click on this, does anything happen?

Ross:

Yeah.

Ben:

It's not going to restart my computer, is it?

Ross:

Thankfully, no. It just gives you very boring popup that says, "Your IT provider recommends you restart your Mac."

Ben:

Okay.

Ross:

And, we're [inaudible 00:24:05].

Ben:

Oh, nice. I didn't even know about that. Awesome.

Ross:

New feature. That one came out in, I think, two revisions ago.

Ben:

Okay.

Ross:

And then, the third thing that can badge is your storage. So right now, you can see on Ben's machine, he's got 73 gigs available. He's still got some good wiggle room there. If you have less than 10% of your storage space free, that's going to badge as well, just to let you know that it's probably about time you take a look at the information on your computer, and try to get some additional space open. And so this Support Menu, it's a great tool for self-remediation. Not just for contacting us, or getting to MacManage, but some other smaller things that you can just take into your own hands, knock out really quick, and improve the experience you have in your computer.

Ben:

Yeah, that's great. I didn't even realize that we had additional features built into that now. And, this is a great resource, too, if you're trying to figure out where your files... what's taking up all the space on your hard drive. And, this will pretty much walk you through the biggest culprits. Do be careful. If you're not sure what to do, we can help you determine what maybe you need to spend some time on. We can't clean it up for you. I don't think that's possible. Unless you want us to just throw everything into the trash. That's easy.

Ross:

We've got a button for that.

Ben:

Yeah.

Ben:

But the other thing here, even though... Oh, I see. If I hover, it gives me the model to my computer.

Ross:

Yep.

Ben:

But, I was going to mention, if you do call in to support, and we have any difficulty finding your computer to maybe get more information, or ask permission to remote in, and look over your shoulder, this is helpful to tell us what the computer name is. Because some organizations have a computer name that do not reflect the person's name. And, they do that for various reasons, but it doesn't make it easy for us trying to provide support, when we're trying to find your computer, based on your name. So you may need to provide your computer name to us, so that that could be helpful.

Ben:

Let's see. Let's get back to our presentation, get me back on track here because we're running out of time.

Ben:

Okay. So we talked about MacManage self-service application. We talked about our Help Center and our Library resources. And then I just wanted to really quickly touch on communication. Because I think all of this really ties into communication. And another way to look at it is there are different ways to communicate. And I was just reflecting on how I communicate. And I use email less and less these days, but I still use it Teams, I use more and more these days for video meetings, either internally or with clients, although we're on Zoom today because Zoom is a better platform, for now at least, for this type of presentation, in my opinion. And we also use Teams for instant messaging, or what's technically called persistent messaging, especially internally.

Ben:

And then Microsoft Edge is currently my default browser. I've had a little bit of frustration with Safari over the years, and I've slowly moved towards alternate browsers. Google is not my favorite browser. I switched to Edge. Everyone has their own preference. There's Firefox, there's Google Chrome, there's Edge, which is based on, I think, the same thing Chrome is based on. There's safari, of course. So use what works for you. But I mentioned the browser because I go online to either watch recorded videos or read articles.

Ben:

And then, of course, Keynote for presentations. And Books was kind of a catch off for PDFs or actual books that I might download and read. And the reason I wanted to mention this is I gave a presentation a couple years ago in Australia, a keynote speech. And one of the topics that I talked about was how we all learn differently.

Ben:

And I honestly thought there was maybe three ways of learning. And in my research, learned that there was ... how many is that? One, two.. eight different, at least, I'm sure there are more by now, eight different ways of learning. And we all learn differently. And the message in that presentation was really, why do we often expect to send out one email to get our message across, right? So I'm kind of sharing this with our audience here because even though you have these self-service items, you can't expect to just tell your team once, and that they will automatically know to use those. They need to be repeated. And maybe even in different formats. Maybe a video, maybe an article, maybe an email, maybe a PDF, maybe all of the above. And it's not just how people learn, but it's when they learn.

Ben:

So today may not be an appropriate time for you to learn about this because you've got other more important things going on. And if you hear that message a few times, you may, at a certain point in time, receive that message when it really is appropriate for you. And then it's going to stick in your brain, and then you're going to make it a habit, and then you're going to start using it.

Ben:

So I have to tell myself this because I sometimes get tired of saying the same things over and over again, but it really is important when you're trying to communicate with a larger audience, even within your own team. And Ross, I will say, even when we were a small team of a dozen of us, we sometimes had to do these things that I'm talking about. Which means we'd have a team meeting, I'd mention it. I'd send an email, I'd mention it. And then a couple weeks later, I would hear someone say, "Well, I didn't I know about that." It's like, "Well, you got the email, you were on the team meeting, how could you not know about it?" But they just still didn't hear about it in their way enough times or at the right time, so...

Ben:

Okay, let's wrap it up. We're a little bit over, but we do have one new support desk article here, which I pulled up earlier. Let's see, holiday. So I know maybe it's a little early to be talking about the holiday. This is not it. This is eight years ago. Okay. Let me go to the Help Center. Ntiva. Here we go, best Apple gifts. So I shouldn't have searched for holiday, I should have searched for gifts.

Ben:

This is an article that talks about some of the less expensive, if you don't want to buy your family or your friends an entire computer, that's understandable. Some of this stuff, $29 for an AirTag. Full disclosure, they'll probably need to spend another $29 to get the fancy container to hold the key fob, or to hold the AirTag. So if you're going to buy them together, you're going to spend at least $60. Maybe you can find some deals out there. But these are the smaller items. And I will say, I have one AirTag that I use it with my key chain. It is kind of nice. I've only lost my keys once that I can remember. I might have blocked the other times out of my mind. And it was a painful experience, and it is kind of nice to know that if these things get too far away from me, I get a little alert saying, "Hey, are you sure you didn't forget your keys?"

Ben:

AirPods. Oh, we've got a typo. We're missing an A, I'll have to fix that. I love my AirPods. I've had, I think, all the variations. And I'm wearing them right now, the latest, and I love them. I don't have a HomePod mini. Do you, Ross?

Ross:

Yes, I do. And I love the little thing.

Ben:

Oh yeah? Oh, awesome.

Ross:

Yeah. I've had one in the kitchen now for about half a year, and it's great. It's great. I'm a big fan of it. Because I used to use an Echo. I eventually got rid of that due to security and privacy concerns, and I feel much more at home. If I'm going to have a wire tap, it may as well be Apple's wire tap.

Ben:

Yeah.

Ross:

And it's just a great little thing you kind of forget about, but it's really convenient to use, and it's handsome.

Ben:

Yeah.

Ross:

Good speaker.

Ben:

Call me a fanboy, but I feel secure with Apple's implementation of the wire tap, as you said. And actually I do have a AirPod... no, HomePod. What was it called? HomePod Pro?

Speaker 3:

It's just called HomePod. [crosstalk 00:32:52]

Ben:

Okay. I have the original HomePod. I haven't yet got a HomePod mini, but I do hear they're great. And I love the options for new colors, but I hate the fact that now I have to choose a color. So...

Ross:

It's much easier when it was just light or dark. Now, it's-

Ben:

That's right. Light or dark. Home or office. Now I've got to make a much bigger decision, so that's why I haven't purchased one.

Ben:

iPads. I've had various iPads over the years. I have a iPad Pro right now. I do love the iPad. I use it more and more when I step away from my computer, and just want to read or maybe watch a video or something, especially on the couch. And then Apple Watch or Apple Watch accessories. Those are great, too. And the reason I'm mentioning this now... I know it's... I don't like to talk about holidays or Christmas before... I like to get Thanksgiving out of the way, but-

Ross:

That's fair.

Ben:

Apparently, all the news this year is supply chain issues. So even Apple, I think, is getting hit with some of these, and you need to plan ahead. Or you're going to be giving someone an IOU Christmas gift come the end of December. Or maybe you say, "No, this... I'm not materialistic. I don't need to buy anything or give any gifts," but if you are going to get a gift, start planning now. That's the news on the street.

Ben:

Anything else you want to add, or do we have any questions that we missed, Ross?

Ross:

No, no. On my end, that pretty much covers it, as far as self-service actions and self-remediation. That's the big task.

Ben:

Okay, great. And next on our... in two weeks, we're back here. We'll be talking about, think automation to improve your business operations. And I'm super-excited about that because I'm passionate about automation, and so much is technically possible these days. It's just a matter of breaking habits and making it happen. And we've done that for a lot of clients, but there's still plenty out there that we could do more for. So, think automation. We'll be talking about that in two weeks, which I think is the Tuesday after Thanksgiving.

Ross:

Perfect.

Ben:

So have a great Thanksgiving, everyone here in the United States, and we'll talk with you later. Bye.

 

About the Ntiva Apple for Business Livestream

Ntiva’s Ben Greiner hosts the Ntiva Apple for Business livestream every other Tuesday from 12:00 to 12:30pm CT. These live events, presented by the Ntiva team of Apple experts, are sharply focused, easily digestible, and cover topics including the latest Apple/macOS/iOS technology updates, cybersecurity, data privacy, MDM and BYOD policies, and more! We take questions from the audience and share what's working—and not working—for us and others in the industry.

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