Ntiva Live: Apple for Business

Apple "Spring Loaded" Event Special

Episode Overview

In this episode, we discuss all of the new items featured in Apple's "Spring Loaded" Event!

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Episode Transcript

Ben Greiner:

Hello. Welcome. Today is Wednesday, April 21st, 2021. Welcome to Ntiva Live; Apple for Business livestream. With me today is Chad Calease, our cyber resilience lead. I'm Ben Greiner, director of Apple Technology. First of all, apologies for the last minute move. We normally do this every Tuesday at noon and because that conflicted with Apple's presentation and we knew we couldn't compete against Apple, we thought it best to move it and rather than do it right after because that's kind of a long session and you never know when Apple is going to end. We've decided to do it the next day. So here we are. And what we're going to do today is just walk through what we heard from Apple yesterday. Talk about what we heard, what we saw, of course try to apply that to business situations, our clients, and a lot of this will bleed over into the personal world as well.

Ben Greiner:

So Chad, did you watch the event?

Chad Calease:

I did. Yeah. Not all of it. I was in between things, but... Yeah. I did. One of the things I'm most excited about, one of the things that stayed with me after, is based on mounts, VESA, everybody says it differently. The V-E-S-A standard mounting size and standard for devices. Apple's always been tricky to work with with those things and having to buy, as you know, Ben, lots of adapters and things to kind of work around that. And so that standard out of the box is... I don't know, it's a small thing, but I was really excited about it.

Ben Greiner:

And so by that you mean standard that you can take this mount off and attach it to something else on an arm or-

Chad Calease:

Sure.

Ben Greiner:

... what they call a swing arm or your desk where you can move it around.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. And that is a lot of value that never existed before, so that's cool.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Well, what's also amazing is this thing only weighs... I think it's less than 20 pounds. And I assume if you take the base off, I don't know if that's 10 pounds without the base or 10 pounds with the base, I haven't looked into it enough to know, but I would say 10 or 20 pounds.

Chad Calease:

The bases are usually heavy.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I mean, it's essentially a large iPad, right? At this point.

Chad Calease:

Exactly. Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

The one difference is I noticed they had to move the power brick to an actual brick. So the days of just having a single cable, which is nice, is now a single cable to a brick that's going to live under your desk. Although they also move the Ethernet down to the brick, which I thought was nice just to give it a clean look. But let's start, as I like to do, from the beginning, go all the way down, quickly touch on everything they addressed starting with clearly tie into earth day, carbon neutral. A lot of talking about that. I cannot verify that information. I can only trust that what Apple is telling me is true, that they have an initiative to get carbon neutral. And they clearly made the Apple Park a central part of the presentation, as they sort of have over the past several introductions

Ben Greiner:

This one I thought was the tightest of all of them because they jammed it all into one hour as opposed to, it's going to be between one and two hours. We don't know when, and there's just a lot of marketing speak. This one was pretty much rapid fire. Boom, boom, boom. The campus looks great. The first thing they mentioned was Apple Card and Apple Card family. Do you use Apple card, Chad?

Chad Calease:

Yeah, I do.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. So do I. Yeah. I haven't, once again, looked into it for the family. I think it makes sense for me and my wife. Now that my kids are in college, maybe not so much. I think making it easier for the family is great. I'm not sure how you divvy up the Apple Cash. Did you notice that?

Chad Calease:

I did. And I thought about that because that's probably the one thing that I do use the most of other members. Right? And so having a single kind of gatekeeper for that would... We'll see how that shakes out [inaudible 00:04:31].

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I mean, I think it's a really good idea. Apple is always, I think, ahead of the curve and-

Chad Calease:

They usually are. Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

Have you looked at your Apple Card statements? They're so much nicer than any other credit card statement I've ever looked at.

Chad Calease:

It's right there. Yeah. It's so friendly. It's so well thought out for real.

Ben Greiner:

And if you don't look at your credit card statements, you really should. That's a public service announcement from me.

Chad Calease:

And they make it easier, I mean, because it's right there. And if you don't have to go to a special place [inaudible 00:05:04] login or whatever, it's very integrated natively into iOS. And I think that's probably a huge sell for me because it's time-saving where I have to go to another... sign in, look up the [inaudible 00:05:18] and log in. And so it's less friction for sure.

Ben Greiner:

I mean, they make it unbelievably easy to get the card. Assuming you have good credit, directly from the phone, you qualify and it's almost instant that you can start using a virtual card and then they send you one. So I think having family members involved, I think that's a great idea. I need to learn more about it. And my family is starting to flee the nest. So it's not quite as important to me today as maybe it was a few years ago. But you have young children, Chad, so keep me in the loop about how that works out.

Chad Calease:

Yeah, for sure.

Ben Greiner:

And it's not just for children, it's for spouses and partners and-

Chad Calease:

No. And our partners.

Ben Greiner:

... anyone you want to share within your family, really. They also touched on podcast, which I think everyone's a little nervous about if Apple is going to try to kill the podcast experience with subscriptions and what that's going to do. The interface looks like it's an improvement. I didn't write down when that's coming. Do you know, Chad, when? And-

Chad Calease:

I don't remember. I just remember-

Ben Greiner:

Okay. I think a lot of this is coming later in this month.

Chad Calease:

I just remember the revenue stats were a little steep. 30% the first year, that was pretty steep in my opinion.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. 15%, I think, the second years.

Chad Calease:

After that. That's reasonable. I mean, that's fair, but 30, I don't know. I think they're going to get some pushback on that because that's asking a lot when someone's trying to start up, especially.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I think some of the stats... And you and I have a podcast, we got computers podcasts that we still continue. And obviously, I don't see us getting to a point where we can charge people to listen to our podcast, unless you're a famous person who already have some really big name advertising and you want to eliminate that and replace it with subscriptions. Yeah. Unless you do that.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. Sponsors and stuff. We're going to have to probably make up the difference, right?

Ben Greiner:

I think they will... What I read is, like you and I have a podcast, it's free right now for us to post. I think it's going to cost $20 a year for us to continue doing that, which is not a lot of money. You're going to get stats off of it. The current beta, the last time I looked at the beta stats for podcast, it wasn't even working well enough for me to use it. So I haven't looked at it in awhile or maybe our listenership was just so low. It just couldn't adjust to anything, but-

Chad Calease:

Yeah. It depends on the show and the sponsors and the traffic for sure.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. It makes sense. Charge something just to keep people... My understanding is a lot of people have created podcasts, but the majority of those podcasts have fewer than I think three episodes.

Chad Calease:

That's true.

Ben Greiner:

So it's like only a third of those on the platform are actually producing anything consistently.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. I mean, staying power is tough. And hopefully that doesn't decrease. So hopefully this will not discourage people from... But of course, it does sometimes seem like there's an awful lot of signal to noise ratio, but it's about reducing the obstacles. Right? We need more voices, more people participating in some kind of conversation about stuff, but we've had good luck with the platform, that's really elegant to use. I don't know that there's a prettier platform out there. There might be. If there is, let us know in the comments. But Apple podcasts has been really kind of... Everybody kind of copies it, seems like.

Ben Greiner:

Right. Well, am I wrong in thinking Apple was the originator of the podcast from the iPod to the podcast? Or-

Chad Calease:

Well, that's kind of how I remember. It was a podcast you made to listen to on your iPod.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Chad Calease:

And that's how I remember it too. I don't know. We should verify that before we just [inaudible 00:09:12].

Ben Greiner:

Yeah, we should. I'm sure if we have the information wrong, someone will tell us.

Chad Calease:

Yes.

Ben Greiner:

And I do believe the podcasting community as I remember, it also really took off and then kind of had a low and I don't know exactly why, but then it really took off again. And it seems to really be thriving. And I guess it's good to see Apple's back in it. We'll see how it plays out with the subscriptions and the $20 barrier to entry. I'm going to go in the order that they presented things, which is a little different than their website. But iPhone 12, this is not a new iPhone, however, it is a new color. So it's kind of unusual for Apple to introduce in the middle of the year a new color, but that's what they did. Spring, purple, Easter egg looking color.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah, it looks cool. My mom would love this. I'm not into purple phones. My mom would love this. I'm not saying... No offense if you love this, Chad. I think it's a beautiful looking phone. My experiences, they don't quite look like this in person. Some of these colors, they're a little more muted, at least the other colors that I've seen. So I don't know what this one really looks like. And that's one of the downsides of the Apple stores being either closed in some states. I know they had to close them in Michigan again, but that's the real value of those stores. You can go into the store if you live near a store and really check out these products, see them in real lighting and hold them and see if that's what you expect.

Chad Calease:

Yes.

Ben Greiner:

But yeah, it looks fun. The colors are fun.

Chad Calease:

Purple's fun. I mean, it reminds me of that Gogol Bordello song, Start Wearing Purple. That's what I was thinking of. Anyway, moving on.

Ben Greiner:

Reminds me of Prince, Purple Rain.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. There you go.

Ben Greiner:

Okay. So then they got to Find My AirTags also. For those of you who don't remember, Find My was find my iPhone, but because it was finding so many things, they dropped the iPhone, it's just Find My. And now they're adding to that these AirTags. And I think they've also opened up the platform to third-party products. So we might see some more things coming to Find My. Like Find My is traditionally the iPhone or your iOS devices, your computer, your friends, if your friends allow you to track your friends or family members. And of course, that tracking is done with the iPhone. So if they leave their iPhone at home and go somewhere else, you're not really tracking them. Parents out there who have children who sneak off in the middle of the night and-

Chad Calease:

It's interesting how they're doing this too. It's worth mentioning. They seem to be very intentional about the privacy and security implications of how this works, right? The way I understand it, correct me if I'm wrong, it's basically relaying those beacons or those signals, those transmissions across iPhones. Right? So it's like bouncing them. It's like a mesh or canopy type distributed architecture where all... If I'm walking near you, Ben, with a tag and I request to like where that tag is, it's going to route like, hey. It's going to say hello through your iPhone to the next one, the next one. It kind of... I don't know that that's ever existed before. Is that how you understand it?

Ben Greiner:

I must admit I haven't gone deep into the tech on this one yet, so I don't know exactly how they're doing it. I do know they made a special mention that this is not for tracking people, it's for tracking objects. Although I've heard people already talk about tracking their pets with us. So I don't know. Pets, are they objects [inaudible 00:13:02]?

Chad Calease:

Yeah. It's a fine line. It's going to bring up a lot of questions, and that's why I think it's interesting to just start scratching the surface now because I have a feeling we're going to be talking about this in another episode in more detail when the time comes.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. And this reminds me, if you've used AirDrop in any recent OS, at least with 14, maybe it came in early 13, iOS 13. Have you noticed when you try to AirDrop to somebody, it gives you a directional arrow, which seems kind of useless. It's like, why do I need a directional arrow to AirDrop this? But now with this platform, it kind of makes sense. If you're trying to find something, it's probably that same technology. It's like, hold your phone, follow the arrow. The video they had was pretty cool. The guy going deep into his couch like a kid.

Chad Calease:

Right. You have to imagine that... I mean, you don't have to imagine. You don't have to do anything, but it's easy to imagine that the pandemic conspired a lot of this, right? With notification, tracking and things like that. But this is going to become more a part of this kind of standard operating designs maybe.

Ben Greiner:

Now, I will say, I personally feel that I've made it 50 years without tracking an object and I can maybe go the rest of my life without tracking an object. So I personally don't feel the need to go out and buy these. Yes I have on occasion lost things. And when I do, it's always a good reminder to stop losing things. So every maybe 10 years, I lose something like my keys that sometimes I get back, sometimes I don't. And then I have to remind myself not to do that again. I personally don't see the need for these. But I will say in office environment, at least back in the old days when we had offices, the bigger your office, the more things get lost, I've noticed. Because sometimes people have shared objects and there's no personal responsibility for those objects. So I could see back when we get to the office in a business environment, if there are key things that you need to track that are not devices, that we can already attract to a certain extent.

Chad Calease:

It's not new. This has existed in the industrial space for a long time. I remember even within the last 10 years, there're clients and consulting that I did, where they had RFID tags. Public sector, private sector, they have massive inventories, shipments and logistical kinds of things that they have to keep sorted. And those same principles work well in tracking a small or midsize office. And I think that the tech and the tactical stuff has just kind of trickled down now, because I remember you could buy tags. They were like square little ones. They were maybe this big and they had a little like key chain on it. You could put it on your keys, you could put it on your gym bag. Like they've been around.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Tiles.

Chad Calease:

There was a kickstarter, maybe. Tiles. Exactly, right? Thank you. And so, I mean, this isn't a new idea. It's just built into the hardware. Consumer hardware in particular is new and it'll be interesting to see what kinds of value people get out of it. Because if you have a lot of... Like a bathroom key was the first thing that came to mind. Like the bathroom keys for shared offices often get lost and it would be really cool if people would be like-

Ben Greiner:

I've taken one home once.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. For sure, we all I have, but that's a good one. Hey, Henry, is that in your pocket? I mean, that's a little bit... [inaudible 00:16:40] privacy and things, but put the key back, Henry. Right?

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. And I read... Let's see. They're $29 each or four for $99. That's the current. I'm sure maybe they'll have more pricing if you want to buy more higher quantities, but... Yeah. It sounds like as Apple does, they take something, it's not like it's brand new. It exists and they just refine it and make it better and get the user experience out there to a point where people adopt it. And I'm not saying the other tags solution isn't already a good solution, but if you build it into the Apple ecosystem, I can see people adopting it at a higher rate. The next thing they talked about was Apple TV. Let's see. I think I went too far. Let me go back here.

Chad Calease:

That's great. The progression of... I don't know if you have a graphic, but I saw a graphic somewhere of the progression of the remote. I should probably find that and share my screen, but-

Ben Greiner:

Oh, yeah. I haven't seen that.

Chad Calease:

... it's a great lesson in design thinking, right? A lot of the things that they did initially to look at the original Apple TV remote and look at today's, there're some very subtle differences, but they try to make it fancy and touch. And now it's back to this very... I haven't used it, but I'm excited because I can tell by looking at it that it's going to be a huge improvement and that's cool.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. It kind of went back to the original concept a little more.

Chad Calease:

It did.

Ben Greiner:

And yeah, I must admit the most recent and the one before that, which was only slightly different, is absolutely terrible. I'm always holding it upside down. It's frustrating.

Chad Calease:

It is. Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

In the dark you're like... and then you're clicking things you don't want to click. Most people, if you have an Apple TV and you can... I don't know how far back it goes, but you can just buy this remote for your existing Apple TV. I think it's $60. And it's kind of a universal remote, maybe. I don't know if all the functions will work unless you have the new Apple TV. I have the previous iteration Apple TV. I don't think there's a huge reason for me to upgrade. And I may even put off buying the remote for now. The Apple TV is really just kind of a box you stick anywhere, in a shelf, behind the TV. You don't see it. To your point, the remote, that's the critical part for interacting with it. You can also use your iPhone or iPad, but-

Chad Calease:

I do. Yeah. I really don't use, I gave up on it. Plus you can do a lot of things faster. I mean, there're some hacks, some nice value to using your phone. But yeah, you're right. I don't know that the TV, other than some of the resolution stuff, it's still 4K. The previous version was 4K too, wasn't it?

Ben Greiner:

It was, yeah. They have now a higher frame rate, I guess, HDR. High frame rate HDR. And if you have an iPhone 12, which can shoot in high frame rate HDR, you can have, I guess, some amazing videos on this. If you have a TV that can produce that, some amazing stuff. And taking it back to the business world, once again, when we had offices, I know Apple TVs were growing in popularity for conference rooms because they were really versatile. There's a lot you can do with them and they're inexpensive for a conference room compared to what used to cost like $10,000 to put into a conference room.

Chad Calease:

Right. [inaudible 00:20:08] Crestron installation or something versus, yeah, just throwing one of those up really quick. I would imagine that would not continue. I would imagine that would continue-

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I think once we get back into the office again, that will continue. We're starting to see some people go back in limited capacity. But I have an Apple TV at home. I love it. I use it every evening to watch a little something. And what was interesting is... I don't know if you saw this, they had a... Sorry. I'm missing the Q&A. I need to get this in here. Well, one of the previous questions was what is Apple Card? Yeah, credit card. I should have explained that before I got too deep into it. But did you see the video where they held an iPhone up to the TV? And people get confused. Apple TV is just the box. You still need a TV, right?

Ben Greiner:

So you want to make sure your TV is high enough resolution to even need an Apple TV 4K. And I'm not a TV specialist, but I know there are lots of TV variations out there. And basically, what you're doing with the Apple TV is offloading a lot of the processing power and resources of the TV into this little box. And that can help things because of these smart TVs, they try to build it all in, but there's limited capacity in those TVs to do some of the renderings. And so Apple is saying, look, no matter what TV you have, as long as it's got the resolution, anything else is compatible. And most of them will downscale.

Chad Calease:

Yeah, they will.

Ben Greiner:

That's not the problem. It's just, don't go buy a 4K Apple TV box if you don't have a 4K Apple TV or a 4K television. But they're saying, we can make things faster, smoother, and sharper and more color accurate. And when they held the iPhone up like a spectrophotometer onto the Apple TV, I was like, oh my God, this is... We used to buy spectrophotometers, like Chris [inaudible 00:22:15] will tell you, 10 years ago for... I can't remember. They started out maybe 20 years ago, like 10 or $5,000. They eventually got to maybe $1,000. I think the cheapest-

Chad Calease:

That's still-

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Cheapest they ever sold them was maybe 350.

Chad Calease:

That's still expensive.

Ben Greiner:

And then you needed software to go with it. And it was all about calibrating color which was also a challenge back in the day when we had TVs that were constantly fluctuating, especially the old cathode-ray tube CRTs. My point being it was amazing to see that, to get more accurate color, not by you sitting in a room adjusting things, but actually doing readings and making it more accurate. I'm really curious to see how that works, how it looks. And I think I would like to see that technology in the IMAX or displays for designers who probably want to do the same thing. They want to see more accurate color on screen. And what better way to do that than with pure data.

Chad Calease:

Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

So anyway, the color is just... The amount of tech that goes into accurate color is beyond the scope of-

Chad Calease:

Astounding. Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

... my comprehension, but that was pretty cool. So, yes, when it comes to Apple TVs, you have two options, a 32 gig at 179 or 64 gig at 199. The only reason I would get the 199 with 64 gigs is if you play a lot of games and you want to download them and keep them. I a 32 gig Apple TV, I basically just do streaming. I never had an issue with storage.

Chad Calease:

No, you shouldn't unless you have... or you have family members that play Apple Arcade, for example, because that's downloading content. So 64 could come in handy for that. But for most people, if you're just watching stuff, the cheaper one's fine.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Oh, there was another comment that definitely prints love the purple iPhone. Yes.

Chad Calease:

Yes. It's awesome.

Ben Greiner:

Yes, there it is. Okay. Let's get to the iMac. And iMac is the latest iteration which we haven't seen in awhile. There was a great image they showed of the old iMac, the big ball with CRT iMac and now everything just keeps going [inaudible 00:24:31] to the point where it's like this.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. It's amazing.

Ben Greiner:

What I wanted to do, because I know we try to keep this short, is I wanted to make sure everyone is aware of this page called compare Mac models. And I'm not sure exactly how I got here, but if you google it or look around, you'll see it. It looks like it's apple.com/mac/compare. And I chose the ones that Apple... They still have some on the list that they don't sell, which is interesting. Like this 4K Retina, I guess that is no longer in stock because you can't buy it. So here's the 21 inch iMac, the old one. Here's the new iMac, 24 inch M1. And then I also put in here... No, that's not what I want to look at. I want to look at a 27 inch 5K Retina. So I just want to kind of compare this because it's really hard when Apple shows you this one model, which is beautiful and fast and faster and all this good, good stuff. But you really want to put it in the context of what's existing today.

Ben Greiner:

And I think once again, the M1 rollout, Apple's plan, although they haven't said this outright, they've made it pretty clear. The M1 rollout, which is a two year process, is starting with their entry-level machines and working their way up. So for those of you on high-end computers and of course-

Chad Calease:

Just wait.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah, wait. I would wait. And this stuff's all-

Chad Calease:

These are entry level all the way.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. This stuff's... it's all relative too. I mean, to be fair, this new iMac should be fantastic for today's needs for most people-

Chad Calease:

Most people, yeah.

Ben Greiner:

... especially compared to a few several years ago. But I think the thing is as technology sees the tools, the processing power that it has, the DAP developers start building for that. And over time, things that used to feel fast, start to feel slow, especially if you sit in front of a faster machine, you really notice it. So what I wanted to show here is not only the price. We've got a 1,099, 1,499, 1,799. We've got screen size 21 and a half 24, 27. I assume over the next year, we're going to see a 27 inch M1 Mac of some kind coming from Apple. And that's why if you're a creative professional or video professional or anyone like that, you might want to wait. This is a great 0.4 inch home personal machine.

Ben Greiner:

In fact, I was considering... I've talked about this before, I have a MacBook Pro and an iPad Pro and I'm almost thinking... Maybe it's just the pandemic speaking, but I'm thinking my next purchase instead of the MacBook Pro will be an iMac. And then I would just use my iPad Pro for travel because I just don't move enough with the MacBook Pro. And when I do move, I tend to take my iPad. Now when I was-

Chad Calease:

That's same for me. A lot of people probably use a laptop in clamshell mode or whatever they call it, where you just close it and you have an external larger display, right? Hooked up to it. And I've been using it in that mode much more since quarantine, for example. So I wouldn't be surprised if the IMAX and the minis kind of start leading way a little bit more. That's a good point, Ben.

Ben Greiner:

I mean, you're always going to get more power for the money in a desktop because you pay a premium for the portability. Take a little bit of a power hit, although that's starting to... we're seeing less and less.

Chad Calease:

[inaudible 00:28:13]. Yeah. But there's still concern for sure.

Ben Greiner:

So just running through the 5K Retina display is still technically a nicer display. And there's lots of other tech specs we can go into. I noticed you can put much more memory into the... we'll call it the Intel iMac. However, that memory is different. It's not integrated. So it's not really a fair comparison. Storage is different. I love the magic keyboard with Touch ID. I use Touch ID all the time. I think that's what's been missing from their current lineup. You can go into more detail here, but we're still... The verdict is still out about graphics. So if you do any heavy rendering, you have a lot more options on the Intel Mac than you do on the M1 with the integrated chip, but don't yet know how that compares. Obviously, more memory, more storage options. Here's the display specs. You can see you've got more pixels. Everything else is pretty much the same, just bigger with more pixels. Oh, here's the weight. So, yeah. Wait, 9.88 pounds. Now, does that include the base? Is that right?

Chad Calease:

I presume so. Yeah. It would be... Well, no, because it's saying like for all of them that it's collective. I presume that's cumulative. So somehow, the middle-

Ben Greiner:

Well, there's this little four. Let's see what this four is for. Size and weight vary by... Okay. This says vary. Well, we'll have to find out. Let's see everything else.

Chad Calease:

It's interesting-

Ben Greiner:

Oh, camera.

Chad Calease:

... that the middle one is actually lighter than the smaller one. The middle one's like way lighter. See, that should be in the middle. Right? But it's not. So I don't know if that's a mistake or if... Because that's interesting.

Ben Greiner:

No. That's because this is the old model.

Chad Calease:

Oh, got you.

Ben Greiner:

This is the new one. Yeah.

Chad Calease:

It weighs nothing.

Ben Greiner:

It weighs nothing. Yeah, it's crazy. And then I really liked... especially with how much video conferencing we're doing. They finally put a really nice camera in the iMac. To be fair, I guess it's the same as the one that's in this one, but this one, the lower end is... Traditionally, these cameras have not been fantastic. And what they showed with the way it processes, it looks like they're really trying to give you your own audio, video, studio for web conferencing, which is pretty cool.

Chad Calease:

Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

So I'm looking forward to more of that from Apple.

Chad Calease:

Yeah, that's cool.

Ben Greiner:

The speakers, this is what they talked about. The microphones, all this stuff is an improvement. And they've got a magic mouse, they've got magic keyboard with Touch ID and they've got trackpads. I personally tried using a trackpad. I don't like it, some people love it. But that's available. Gigabit Ethernet. So if you want 10 gig Ethernet, you still got to go to the Intel iMac.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. And that's awesome because for servers or anything production, workflow video related, that's fantastic. A 10 gig Ethernet.

Ben Greiner:

So the question is what color? This is kind of like... I don't want to make a decision about color. It's too much for me. Do you go safe silver? Do you have fun with orange or red? I don't know. One of the things I wanted to do, I know we're almost at time, but let's see if this works. Okay. So the last thing they talked about which we can run through quickly is the iPad Pro. So I have a previous generation iPad Pro with this keyboard. I don't know why anyone would ask for a white keyboard unless you're super ultra clean. You never put any lotions on your hand. I don't know how that's going to work.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. That's tough, man.

Ben Greiner:

It does look cool.

Chad Calease:

It does, yeah.

Ben Greiner:

Maybe in California where the sun bleaches everything. It'll be great. But here in Chicago, I think I just see that getting dingy way too quickly. Super powerful.

Chad Calease:

Super portable, powerful.

Ben Greiner:

Super portable. I don't know if I have a real need to go out and get the new iPad Pro. I don't think... I mean, it would just be kind of silly for me. Do you have a preference or a thought on that, Chad?

Chad Calease:

No. I haven't really made the jump. Like pre quarantine when we would go on site, I would bring a lappy, a MacBook Pro, and I used it on a stand of this amount and I still do. But I haven't made the transition to just an iOS device only. I probably use my phone as much or more than my lappy, but I haven't... The iPad for me is really just a consumer... Like I consume content and like late at night, I'll watch a movie on it. But that's about it. I haven't really made the jump, but you have. You use it all the time.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I use it more and more. I use the Apple products pages and numbers, and also more and more for work. I do use Excel and word. So the apps are continuing to get better and better. The platform continues to get better. I am creating more on this device than ever before, as opposed to just taking the information in. I want to make a note about the displays. The displays are getting so good. At what point does the human eye not really care?

Chad Calease:

Well, the gamers do. The gamers will complain about the response time, right? Especially the price point that we're talking about, right? It should probably be better performer, but for everyday people, I don't know that anybody could really complain to you. I mean-

Ben Greiner:

I mean, I just think at a certain point, are we going to be able to visually see the difference between the additional technology they'll keep throwing into this?

Chad Calease:

I don't know.

Ben Greiner:

And maybe there will be additional reasons for that, that I'm not even aware of down the road. But if you're thinking about an iPad, now's the time to buy one. I would definitely consider this. And I wanted to try something. I tried to do this with the iPad, but the technology I have set up would not work. It only works with the iPhone. So I'm going to try switching to my iPhone here.

Chad Calease:

Oh, yeah. Now we can see your video.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Chad Calease:

And that's-

Ben Greiner:

Okay. I got to move my phone around.

Chad Calease:

There you go.

Ben Greiner:

Okay. Here we go.

Chad Calease:

Cool. Well done.

Ben Greiner:

I just put through the new iMac on my desk and we can turn it around-

Chad Calease:

It's pretty good.

Ben Greiner:

... and look at it. Yeah.

Chad Calease:

Blue. Each you pick it blue, huh?

Ben Greiner:

[inaudible 00:35:24] too big. Yeah, blue. There it is hundred percent.

Chad Calease:

It's cool.

Ben Greiner:

Have you played with this AR stuff?

Chad Calease:

No, not really. Haven't had time.

Ben Greiner:

This is what I think is going to be helpful. If you want to visualize the color in your space, you need to get iPhone or iPad with AR capabilities, which I don't know if... I think you have to have the LiDAR, the little LiDAR reader. I think, could be wrong, this is what you need. And it reads your space and then it plops down the object which you can really examine and take a look at. Whoops, I made it too small. There's little mini... I'm trying to flip it around. Here we go.

Chad Calease:

It's cool.

Ben Greiner:

Flip it around a hundred percent. It locks in at a hundred percent. Yeah. And then you can see the ports here.

Chad Calease:

[inaudible 00:36:26].

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Chad Calease:

Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

The magnetic and core thread... What do they call it? A fabric cord, which is nice. So, yeah. I thought that was fun. If you haven't tried that out, give it a try.

Chad Calease:

That's cool.

Ben Greiner:

And sorry for the technical fumbling there.

Chad Calease:

No, it's okay. [inaudible 00:36:49] take risks sometimes.

Ben Greiner:

So what was the question, again? I didn't really answer that [inaudible 00:36:54].

Chad Calease:

Well, we answered the one and now she has another good one. She says, is the M1 chip proven and viable? Well, it's proven and viable, at least as far as these products go. I think these early release. And anytime a company like Apple, especially when they release a new line, this is how they usually do it. They release it to a non pro audience to get the first, the widest adoption and sell the most too. Right? There's some strategy behind that. But also, they do want to prove this in the wild before they come up with the Pro apps, right? The Pro apps usually come later because... Well, you were talking about that a little bit before, Ben. There's a lot more demand and it would impact productivity. So that is yet to be seen. That's a really great question because ARM, that architecture has not been used in Apple products yet. This's the first time. So certainly, all the things associated with that architecture or the memory usage, everything is different. So is it viable and proven? I wouldn't say not just yet, but it's well on its way for sure.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. And I know we've gone over a bit, but I think it's worth focusing here for a minute because that's a great question.

Chad Calease:

That's a good question. Thank you.

Ben Greiner:

If you go to, isapplesiliconready.com and M1 is Apple silicon. There's a pretty good list of apps here. And the one I like to look at, a couple of them. First, let's look at Adobe because Adobe is one that our clients use a lot. And you can see there's a lot of red nose here meaning these apps, Lightroom, Dreamweaver, Dimensions, even Premiere Pro alert, InCopy. Those are not M1 optimized. You have to run them in Rosetta 2. Rosetta is an emulator. It's going to run, but it's not going to be ideal. And in some cases, Adobe Dimensions can't run at all.

Chad Calease:

Right.

Ben Greiner:

And so in design... No, here. Photoshop. So Photoshop, that's the premiere product that makes sense. They put that out first. It is M1 optimized. If you live in Photoshop, M1 could be a fantastic solution for you. Microsoft is another one that a lot of our clients use including ourselves. And Microsoft has done a great job putting out M1 optimized apps, but surprisingly, Teams, which is what I live in now so much-

Chad Calease:

It's a deal breaker for some. Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. It's not there yet. So I would have to run in Rosetta 2, the emulator. So you really have to be careful. We've had clients go out in the excitement of the Apple presentation buying-

Chad Calease:

We have one client that went out and bought multiple. They didn't buy just one. They bought multiple. And what did they end up doing, Ben?

Ben Greiner:

M1s, yeah. They had to take them back because the app that they needed the most, not only did it not run on the M1, it was a terrible experience and they just couldn't get any work done. So you have to be careful about that. M1 is the future. It's going to be fantastic, but it's early days-

Chad Calease:

Yeah. It's going to take a little while.

Ben Greiner:

I mean, if anyone's been around... like Chad and I have long enough to remember the move from power PC to Intel, this is the same thing. There were-

Chad Calease:

The plus side is some folks will have some like weird third-party or custom app that someone wrote for them, maybe their HR platform or something some time ago, and maybe it'll just work in Rosetta and they won't even notice, right?

Ben Greiner:

And they won't notice. Right.

Chad Calease:

But there's no way to verify that until you... There's a lot of things that are not on this list, for example. This is a great list, but there's going to be things that aren't on it. And so it's in your best interest to wait if you have any real concerns about productivity. This [inaudible 00:40:44] edge, right?

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Here's another one. We've seen issues with Dropbox and Box Drive and with M1.

Chad Calease:

A lot of folks use those. Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. And you can see Box Drive isn't working at all. There's a private beta right now. Why they couldn't get it to work by now, I don't know. But we have to be careful of that. And then the previous question, which is, what's the real difference between the previous iPad Pro and this new release? It's just the tech specs are that much better. I don't think there's anything that I saw, unless I missed something revolutionary.

Chad Calease:

I'm sure it's a little faster, a little... it looks different. That's a... Yeah. Go ahead.

Ben Greiner:

There was one thing. Small thing, but they have this technology called Center Stage.

Chad Calease:

That's right. That's a good point.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. And for some reason, it's only in the iPad. Or is it in the new iMac? [inaudible 00:41:37].

Chad Calease:

I think it's in both. I have to go back, but I think It's in both.

Ben Greiner:

It seems like it should be in both.

Chad Calease:

Center Stage. Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

But I wrote it down on the iPad. Anyway, Center Stage, I'm sure we could find it on Apple's website. But Center Stage, basically, uses the camera to track you as you move around. Obviously, if you move too far, it can't move completely, but it can move within the frame and track you. And if somebody joins you in the frame, it zooms out to include both of you or zooms in if it's just you. And that's the technology that a little camera called huddle has had for a while because we were using that, huddle camera. I think it's called huddle. And that was pretty cool technology when I first saw it there. And it's great to see Apple is including it. But I would say other than that... And there's got to be a way to... Let's see, compare iPads.

Chad Calease:

Well, performance wise, from just a practical everyday person's use, I don't know that it would be dramatically different.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Here's the same thing. Apple.com/iPad/compare, or just search for it here on Apple's website. This is a great tool to kind of give you some perspective. Like if I have a previous generation iPad Pro 11 inch, that's not quite what I have, but we'll go with that. And then is this the newest one? I think so.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. It looks like it.

Ben Greiner:

Think so. Yeah. So you can kind of just go down the list and see if there's anything that speaks to you that makes it worthwhile with the upgrade. And also take advantage of Apple's trading program. We also use a second life Mac for trade-ins, but between Apple.

Chad Calease:

[inaudible 00:43:28] city, but most major metropolitan areas have something like that, where you can recycle Macs or they take them and refurbish them, write you a check and donate them to say schools and community organizations. There's a lot of great ways to make use of that old hardware.

Ben Greiner:

So I might get for my iPad Pro probably not $580, unless it's really relatively new, but I could get a few $100. I might get $300 off out of it.

Chad Calease:

Yeah. [inaudible 00:44:00].

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. That's a great thing to do. And I know we went over. I apologize for that, but... Yeah. It was worth it.

Chad Calease:

Thanks for sticking with us. Your questions were good.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Thanks for the questions. And in two weeks, we're going to be back here with a special guest, Jason [inaudible 00:44:16] who's the CEO and founder of [inaudible 00:44:19]. And [inaudible 00:44:18] is a mobile device management MDM solution, focused a hundred percent on the Apple platform. It's one that we use and have for a while. And we're going to talk to him about what's going on today with Apple and the future of Apple and managing Apple devices.

Chad Calease:

Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

So I'm excited about that.

Chad Calease:

Me too.

Ben Greiner:

Thanks everyone. We're signing off and we'll see in two weeks.

Chad Calease:

Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

Thanks. Bye.

About the Ntiva Apple for Business Livestream

Ntiva’s Ben Greiner and Chad Calease host the Ntiva Apple for Business livestream every other Tuesday from 12:00 to 12:30pm CT. These live events, presented by the Ntiva team of Apple experts, are sharply focused, easily digestible, and cover topics including the latest Apple/macOS/iOS technology updates, cybersecurity, data privacy, MDM and BYOD policies, and more! We take questions from the audience and share what's working—and not working—for us and others in the industry.

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