Ntiva Live: Apple for Business

With Frank Smith, Cybersecurity Manager and Consultant at Ntiva

Episode Overview

In this episode, we're joined by Frank Smith, Cybersecurity Manager and Consultant (CISSP, CMMC-AB) at Ntiva.

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Episode Transcript

Ben Greiner:

Hi everyone. Today is Tuesday, July 13th, 2021. Live streaming from Chicago. I'm Ben Greiner, director of Apple Technology at Ntiva and today our guest is Frank Smith, manager of security and consulting services at Ntiva. And Frank has told me he has a meeting all the way up until the hour. So he's going to join us in just a minute. And you might have noticed these things popping up. I'm trying out this new feature as part of the video cast and I can already see it's getting in the way as I make unnecessary hand signals. Regardless, we'll continue. I want to just share a little bit about, while we're waiting for Frank to come on board, about why I had to cancel the last live stream because I didn't look far enough ahead on my schedule for the most part, to be honest with you. But also I was able to visit this beautiful place in Cupertino, California.

Ben Greiner:

And that's about as close as I could get to the Apple campus. You can see here that I was across the street. There's a street here and I'm looking at the Apple campus and I was on the roof deck of the Apple visitor center, the retail store there. Anyone can go there and if you do make it to the Cupertino, San Jose, San Francisco area, I do recommend to stop by. It's very cool, very interesting. And today we're going to be talking about security and some of you may be wondering why do we keep talking about security? And the reason is it is so important today. Unfortunately I did not get into this business because of security. I got into this business because I enjoyed helping people and I had an affinity for technology and technology troubleshooting, but fortunately, security is now becoming a part of the job of technology management.

Ben Greiner:

And I can't stress this enough that everybody needs to build a culture of security and resilience, as we like to call it, in your organization. This is not something that happens passively. This is something that you have to take an initiative on and you have to make happen. And we see too many organizations not be proactive enough in their security and they get compromised in seemingly small ways, but sometimes those small dings add up. So it's super important for somebody in your organization to really take charge and say, "I'm going to make it my priority to build a culture of security and resilience in my organization." And there's no one thing that you can do. There are multiple things. In fact, it's called defense in depth and here's a quick slide. It's kind of analogist, this is the analogy we use, to cars.

Ben Greiner:

Cars don't have just one thing. And in fact, early cars didn't have a lot of today's modern security, best practices. Today we have anti-lock braking systems, airbags, safety belts, a lot of visual and audio cues to help us stay safe when driving and the same thing is true when it comes to security. You have to build your defense in depth. You have to have multiple layers, whether it's endpoint protection, whether it's cloud backup, certainly and most importantly ... you can see my hand gestures. Even when you can't see me, I'm involuntarily making hand gestures.

Ben Greiner:

You have to think about security awareness training. So while we're waiting for Frank to join us out, I want to jump right into something that I've run into several times recently and it's this two factor authentication. Two factor authentication specifically for Apple IDs. And here's a website where Apple's K base talks about two factor authentication. And most importantly I want to scroll down on this page to an area, if I can find it. Manage your account, manage your trusted phone numbers. So two factor authentication for most people, especially with Apple IDs, means that they're going to get a two factor code sent to their phone. Okay. I want to remind everyone, I'm monitoring the questions and answers. So if you have any questions, I might have the answers, but I'm going to try to monitor the Q&A board so post your questions here.

Ben Greiner:

So manage your trusted phones. The reason I'm talking about this is because I've recently, through a short period of time, run into issues where I knew someone who lost their phone in the back woods and needed to find it, someone who had their phones stolen and of course needed a new phone, and then my son recently had an old phone that ran out of battery, would not charge. And in all of those cases, they all had Apple IDs with two factor turned on because it's pretty much a requirement today. I don't know that Apple will even allow you to have an Apple ID without two factor turned on, at least that's the world I live in. Maybe there's still a way to bypass that. I'm not sure. But the point is in all of these situations, the phone was the only device these people have and it was lost.

Ben Greiner:

So in order to get back into the Apple ecosystem, you need to log in with your Apple ID or to locate your phone you need to log into your Apple ID and get that two factor. And for example, my son, as he was setting up his new phone, the new phone set up said, "Please set up Apple ID or log in with your Apple ID." Of course he couldn't log in with his Apple ID because the two factor went to his phone and his phone was dead. And typically a lot of us may have other devices we can use to circumvent that, but not always. If you're traveling with just your phone, if you lose your phone and you don't have another Apple device, or in the case of my son, he only had his phone with him and he was not in state.

Ben Greiner:

He was out of state. He only had his phone with him and his phone was dead. So the reason I'm harping on this is there's something called tabletop exercises when it comes to security. And Frank's joining us right now. So Frank can probably talk better about tabletop exercises, but Frank, I was just about to mention tabletop exercises is the idea that you want to walk through a security scenario before it happens, right? Because when it happens is pretty stressful. In the context of this story, I'm talking about people who have lost their iPhone in one of several ways and you'll see, you missed it, but I'm using these hand gestures now that are getting in the way of things. But anyway. So my son, his battery died, I sent him a new phone. That was after I had to jump through several security hoops with AT&T because if you try to buy a phone online and send it to someone in another state, they raise a red flag and rightfully so. I'm glad they did.

Ben Greiner:

I wouldn't want someone stealing my phone, but it was kind of irritating. I had to actually go into the store and I had to actually show them my driver's license in order to get them to ship that phone. Once again, telling myself, "Hey. It's okay. This is for my best security, to protect myself, my family, my team." But I think everyone should walk through this exercise of what if you lost your phone. And another story about that is I just talked to somebody who has an Android phone and they lost the Android phone in a cab, right? So just like with anything, they called Uber and said, "Hey. I lost my phone in the cab. Can you track that cab down so that we can get my phone back?" And they said, "Yes. We just need, for authentication or security purposes, we need your two factor."

Ben Greiner:

It's like, "Well my two factor delivers to my phone and my phone is lost." So Uber would not help him because he could not prove that he was who he was because he didn't have the two factor, which went to his phone, which was lost. So Apple has a K base article on how you can add additional trusted numbers to your file. So I did this today. I went on my own account and said, "I've seen this happen to three people now, three, and I need, in a tabletop exercise where I lose my phone, how am I going to recover from that?" And so I added my wife as another two factor source. So if I need to log in with an Apple ID from another device, I can do that using my wife's two factor. But Frank, thank you for joining us. I know you said you had a meeting down to the wire. It seems like that's a trend recently. All my guests just make me sweat it out to the very end before they show up.

Frank Smith:

Yeah. Back to back to back to back. It's the COVID influence, I think. But-

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Before we get started, Frank, I wanted to mention that you have a lot of acronyms behind your name.

Frank Smith:

Yes.

Ben Greiner:

I see CI, SSP, CMMC-AB RP. And I wondered if you could translate those for us, at least for me. Maybe our audience already knows what those means.

Frank Smith:

No. So CISSP, I'm a Certified Information Systems Security Professional. ISC squared is the certifying body. Basically guarantees after you take a 600 question test and they verify employment and experience and do all those kinds of things. So there's maybe a hundred thousand, 125,000 of us. CMMC-AB is the Cyber Security Maturity Model Certification Accreditation Body. And that's a new DOD standard and I passed their first level test for being a registered practitioner there. So that's what that means.

Ben Greiner:

And that's the AB RP, that's part of the same thing?

Frank Smith:

Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

Okay. Okay.

Frank Smith:

And that's a new set of standards that's being enforced on all the government contractors.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

Actually basically do business with the DOD, but expect that to be across the federal government within a few years now with all these new things. And we're seeing a phenomenal amount of supply chain flow down simply because of the companies can't even have like their law firm look at their contracts anymore without flowing down the requirements and supply chains are flowing it through all the way down to the lowest level like material suppliers. And this is all part of solar winds, Microsoft, FireEye, Colonial Pipeline, [inaudible 00:11:52], all these supply chain hacks basically are causing a different approach to occur if you will.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Yeah. I was going to mention ... lost my window here. Here we go. I was recently reading in The Economist this article that mentioned Colonial and said Colonial, talking about Colonial Pipeline hack, "Had not taken," ... first of all, by the way, this is not mirroring. Like you can see what I'm showing you, right? You can read what I'm showing you?

Frank Smith:

Yes. Yes.

Ben Greiner:

Okay.

Frank Smith:

It looks great.

Ben Greiner:

Okay. Because like every app has the option to mirror. I'm like, "Oh my God. If I double mirror, does that mean it's right or wrong?" So anyway. They said, "The Colonial Pipeline hack, Colonial had not taken even simple precautions." Is that true? Is that what you've read?

Frank Smith:

So the hack came from, allegedly now, it's not been completely finalized and released. The hackers got in by using a compromised password on a different account. So this was somebody who used a password on a private account, on a g-mail, on a Verizon, on a LinkedIn, wherever it came from. They reuse the password on their Colonial Pipeline account.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

So that's bad.

Ben Greiner:

Right.

Frank Smith:

You should never reuse passwords. They came in through the VPN. There was no multi-factor authentication on the VPN.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

So boom, the attackers inside the environment. Once they were inside the environment, it was fair game. I understand that Colonial Pipeline now has MFA on their VPN.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I mean, it's still amazing to me that companies will not take even the basic precautions to keep themselves from getting hacked.

Frank Smith:

Everything becomes a, "Well that's inconvenient." The users push back or it costs money or usually some combination.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

MFA on their VPN, say three bucks a month per user. How many users do they have? I don't know. Right.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

It's real money, yeah. But I think if you do the math, the five million dollars that they spent would have bought a lot of VPN.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Right.

Frank Smith:

It would've bought a lot of cybersecurity and this is all about layering these defenses.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

It's doing the basics, which might even be free. Right? Good passwords, making sure people understand the risks, train them in phishing prevention training so that they don't click on stuff and give away their username and password. Then just layering it and deploy the right technology. There are technologies out there that would block that kind of ransomware from spreading, but you're not going to do it with standard antivirus anymore. And it's even possible that they turned around and in some environments, you never know, maybe they were running Windows Defender or something like that.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

The Kaseya hack that occurred over the 4th of July weekend, the very first thing their scripts did was disable Windows Defender. Turned it off. So they had free reign from that point forward.

Ben Greiner:

Well, to relate this back to Apple Technology, which is our focus. And you've heard me say this before I'm sure, but I feel like people who live in the Apple ecosystem and have for many years, they're still kind of not up to speed on the threats that are out there.

Frank Smith:

Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

I've even talked to companies who mistakenly think that simply by switching platforms from Windows to Apple, that that's their security practice. And one thing you missed right before you joined here was a slide I popped up, which you just mentioned, defense and depth and having these. You have to have multiple layers of defense and this stuff is constantly changing. And one of the things that I also read in this article, which may be hard to see here, but is basically people are having a hard time even understanding what's effective and what's not effective. And there was some talk about even the security software that's out there sometimes is a bit mystical. Like, does it work? Will it work? And I have seen some of the larger companies that we work with, they tend to move around. Like, "Let's try this. Let's try that." So what do you think? Like ...

Frank Smith:

So to your first point, the Apple ecosystem is inherently from a pure technology standpoint is less attacked. The malware that spreads over Windows computers is less likely to spread over max. But the fundamental way that people are getting in and having data exfiltration and servers that are hacked and things like that goes back to bad passwords, no MFA and [inaudible 00:17:27] and phishing emails and compromised credentials that come through the phish. And if you didn't pick it up, LinkedIn was scraped of 770 million, I think is the number, user account data information. Microsoft says it's not a breach because there was no PII, but because I know your username, maybe I have your password, maybe I have your email address, your telephone number, all publicly available stuff, you're that much more vulnerable for phishing emails and that makes you more susceptible to credential compromise and that's platform independent.

Ben Greiner:

Right.

Frank Smith:

That makes no difference which platform you're using.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative) Yeah. We had an issue years ago where we got a call from internal IT saying that an Apple server in their environment had way too much network activity and they didn't know why. And it turned out that somebody within that environment, as a test, had bound that Mac to active directory using the credentials like admin, admin, something generic like that.

Frank Smith:

Of course.

Ben Greiner:

And it was like a public server back in the day when you would host things from your office. It was a public server doing something like extensive portfolio. So the hackers had found this, had gotten into the Mac, which had then allowed them to get into active directory, which then allowed them to start exploring. And I was just reading that that's kind of similar to what happened way back when 10 years ago with this RSA hack. Do you remember RSA? Those little [doggles 00:19:15]?

Ben Greiner:

They had a big hack in 2011. I was just reading about this because I guess it's been 10 years, now people can talk about it. And it sounded like somebody got compromised. One guy got compromised and then they just took their time getting next step, next step, next step until it was too late. And that's why I kind of cringe when I see people using their personal devices or personal email accounts with either personal accounts on company computers or personal devices with company data. And could you talk a little bit about why I would cringe when I see that?

Frank Smith:

No. And you should rightly cringe, but you're getting this blend. You lose control of the data when it's on a personal device. So there's this overlap between security and privacy and all that kind of stuff. My biggest heartburn with people using BYOD iPhones is they insist on using the default Apple email package. They love it.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

I'm an Android user. I can't say whether or not it's good or bad, right?

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Frank Smith:

But as soon as you use that app, the company loses the ability to control that data. Whereas if you force people to use the Outlook app and you have some type of a controlled environment in enclave, if you will, on the device that the company manages at least you can help protect that data.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

Cell phones, SMS for MFA, it's not secure. We discourage it. I know a lot of places, including your bank, may offer SMS as the MFA. Cell phones are hackable. I have direct experience with a reasonably high profile client. And one of their more senior staff members, a family members personal devices were hacked. Now that may have been coincidence, but it just as well could have been a targeted attack and-

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Frank Smith:

How they got into it I think we'll never completely know. Personal accounts, and this is rampant, password reset for your like a fallback email address.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

And they're linking your work address to your AOL, to your Gmail, to whatever account and people are falling for credential compromise through that. And it's just this kind of snowballing sort of problem.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I had posted recently or shared something on LinkedIn where I was getting a few texts, which are going around now. We've seen lots of people get these. But it says something about the Illinois DMV needed my updated license information in order to process something.

Frank Smith:

Yep.

Ben Greiner:

Now it is true that the Illinois DMV is way behind. I know this for a fact. We've tried to go there. My wife tried to go there. It was a four hour line the first time and then eventually she bit the bullet and went back and stood in line for like three and a half hours. So if I know that and I see a text offering to fix that for me, my first reaction is, "Oh, this is great. This is what I've been waiting for."

Frank Smith:

Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

But there was something suspicious about it. First of all, the URL was not what I would expect. And out of curiosity, I went to another device and typed it in just to see what it was and they had built an entire page that looked exactly like the Illinois Department of Transportation and was asking for all the information I believe they would need to impersonate someone.

Frank Smith:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ben Greiner:

It was hard to say exactly what they were after, but if you gave this to them, they would have everything they needed probably to get a license I suppose.

Frank Smith:

And it may not even be for that kind of information. It would be just the icing on the cake for filing a false unemployment claim, which has been a huge industry over the last 14 months. And it's not just the compromise of the devices, it's the sharing of the information that allows all kinds of fraud to occur.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative) Yeah. And for a long time living in the Apple world, I was really hesitant to talk too much about security because I felt like I was fear-mongering. But at a certain point in time, it became clear that I was really doing a disservice by not talking about it. And I know sometimes I still feel like I talk about it too much, but then I see so many people getting compromised, I'm like, "I'm not talking about it enough." So that's one of the reasons why I wanted you to be here and to hear from you and just to remind people, as I said at the beginning of the call here or the live stream, you really have to build this culture of security and resilience within your own corporation. Somebody has to take charge to do that. It's not going to happen on its own. You have to be very diligent and repeat yourselves in meetings and train your staff and never assume that just because you know it that others on your team know it as well.

Frank Smith:

Yeah. And that's an interesting thing because the single weakest link in everything is people falling for phishing emails and doing things they're not supposed to do. And take it to your previous comment, it's much harder to see those links and figure out that that's a phish if you're doing it on a mobile device.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

They just don't show up the same. People are very much prone to looking at their phone and tapping and clicking and you don't know where it's going. So yeah. That's a huge problem. Huge problem.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Let's see. I have a question here. Could you tell us business owners exactly what we should do or at least best practices when it comes to protecting employees iPhones, which they're using to access company data. That's a great question. So we're talking about typically what you mentioned earlier, BYOD, bring your own device. Sorry. I got to turn these hand signals off, but yeah. What can you do? I mean, there is a way to either manage those devices or prohibit somebody from getting access to company data unless they have certain criteria or meet certain criteria, right? There's a term for that too. It always escapes me and I just had a conversation this morning about it, where basically I'm only going to let you have access to company email if you prove that you either have-

Frank Smith:

Oh yeah.

Ben Greiner:

Managed phone or managed credentials.

Frank Smith:

The device enrollment and you're forcing a single piece of hardware to be the source for accessing the information. Yeah.

Ben Greiner:

It's not compliant access, but it's conditional access. That's what I was [crosstalk 00:26:50] Conditional access. Like we will give you access based on these conditions, if you meet these conditions.

Frank Smith:

Sure.

Ben Greiner:

And that's going to only take you so far because then you may still, if your services aren't totally locked down, there's nothing, in some cases, stopping someone from going home, getting an iPad, logging into their email, leaving that iPad on the dining room table, kid comes over, picks it up-

Frank Smith:

Yep.

Ben Greiner:

Starts doing something with it. So it's a combination of security awareness training-

Frank Smith:

Yep.

Ben Greiner:

Security awareness training. Maybe putting some technology in place to-

Frank Smith:

Yep.

Ben Greiner:

Help people with some bumpers in place so they don't accidentally do something incorrect. And just continuing to build that culture of always being, not just aware, but reporting things when something happens. And I think that's another area I've seen businesses and business owners fall short. They get embarrassed when they are compromised.

Frank Smith:

Yeah. Lot of companies don't like to advertise that they've had an issue. But that's changing. Solar winds brought that to a head. Supposedly they were keeping quiet and FireEye is the one who blew the whistle. And then that just snowballed from there. Based on the number of vulnerability announcements and things that I see these days, the attitude is changing. Now companies that have been hacked, organizations that have been hacked, are probably reputationally less likely to want to say, "Oh hey, by the way, we got hacked."

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Frank Smith:

But the flip side is, is they do have obligatory and legal notification requirements.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

So you're going to see more of that, that they're going to say, "Look, this happened to us and this is what we believe was compromised and this is what you can do to prevent or at least mitigate."

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I had a situation maybe a year or so ago where I was talking with a company and their invoice was duplicated by playing a bad actor. And if you take a look at anyone's website, not to tell people how to go about hacking somebody, but you can see often who people work with because they have company logos like, "Hey. Here are our favorite clients." So somehow this perpetrator had gotten a hold of a real invoice and had duplicated that and was sending it out to these clients or at least the one client. We knew of one client it was being sent to. And the natural reaction when that is discovered is obviously we want fix this, but when I said, "You need to tell all of your clients to look out for this," they didn't like that. They didn't like that.

Ben Greiner:

They felt uneasy about it, right? And I think ultimately they made the right decision and they did contact all of their clients and said, "Hey. This is what's happening. Please be aware." And that's what this is all about, sharing what you see, making people more aware so we can all protect ourselves. As you said, it is changing, but I still see some embarrassment like, "Oh. Well maybe we did something wrong." Like you didn't do anything wrong. You did the best you could. This happened and you need to do everything you can to stop it from spreading.

Frank Smith:

So interestingly enough, I got that from a client this morning.

Ben Greiner:

Oh really? This morning.

Frank Smith:

Somewhere that they have routinely bought things announced that they had been hacked and they were fairly upfront. They said, "The type of attack we saw, this is the information we believe they've already gotten away with." It was a data exfiltration. "This is what we think you should do." My guidance was still, "Okay. They said no credit card data was compromised." If it was my credit card, I'd probably still cancel the credit card.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Yeah.

Frank Smith:

But that's a business decision because there's a lot of pain with doing that. And again, to kind of take it back into the Apple versus Window discussion, all of that is completely platform independent.

Ben Greiner:

Right. Right.

Frank Smith:

These data breaches ... I have lifetime credit monitoring from the federal government because I was part of the original OPM data breach, what, 2015 maybe. I don't even remember now. Because somebody took a portable hard drive home and lost it. And it contained social security numbers on however many, hundreds of thousands of people. Of course it's low bid. The federal government went out and got the lowest bidder-

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Frank Smith:

Through the credit monitoring, but I got that going for me.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Frank Smith:

But when you allow certain things out of your physical environment and we have for the last 14 months and we have lots of mobile devices, it's just terrible. Most of the Apple phones that have come out, and I think most people would probably upgrade those a lot quicker than those of us using five and six year old Androids do.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah.

Frank Smith:

You've got at least device encryption on it and there's capability that'll automatically wipe and things like that. But you still want to do the appropriate things.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

You should still, if it's BYOD, the company should still be putting some type of a device enrollment on it. They should be doing some type of management of people's personal devices. Especially if you get a stipend every month that says, "We're going to give you $50 a month towards your cell phone bill."

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

That gives the company the right to install something.

Ben Greiner:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Frank Smith:

They're not going to monitor your pictures or they're not going to see where your browsing is going to go, but they're going to protect their information and it gives them another way of allowing that device and to use company data.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. Yeah. And Apple especially is very concerned about security and privacy. So I know the management of those personal devices is very limited. And I think in summary, what I would say to anyone who is concerned about security, and everyone should be concerned about security, is if you don't have a plan on how to reduce your risk, then definitely talk to Ntiva If you're a client or talk to us if you're not and you need help with any of that stuff because it's about building a plan to reduce your risk and we can never reduce it to zero, unless you're going to go live in the woods without computers. Then you have other risk that you have to deal with.

Frank Smith:

Yep.

Ben Greiner:

But yeah. So many people they don't have a plan and they're just hoping that they're not the ones who get hacked and that is no plan. That is-

Frank Smith:

No.

Ben Greiner:

Not a plan.

Frank Smith:

No. And you need to write it down because when you have an incident is not the time to be figuring out who you should call and what actions you should take.

Ben Greiner:

Right.

Frank Smith:

You write it down ahead of time so that in your worst possible moment, all you're doing is following a checklist. Read a step, do a step, eat a banana.

Ben Greiner:

Right.

Frank Smith:

Make it so that a monkey can do it.

Ben Greiner:

Right.

Frank Smith:

Because if it's a significant issue, you do not want to be trying to scramble and figure out who has somebody's phone number or who has the support number for whoever to call. That's not the time to be looking for that stuff.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah, right. And I see a lot of clients get bogged down on that because they try to think of all the scenarios and it's like, "You know what? Just do the best you can. You're not going to get it perfect. When it does happen you're at least going to have something to start with and to help you get that much further, faster."

Frank Smith:

Yep.

Ben Greiner:

So that's our time for today. I do want to mention one more thing before we go is I just want to remind everyone, we are slowly rebranding the Apple forget computers help center. It's still at support.forgetcomputers.com, but we've got the Ntiva identity and new content there. So continue to check that out and eventually we'll get the domain moved over. Keep the questions coming. I know we have another guest planned in a couple of weeks from Extensis. We're going to be talking about universal type server and maybe portfolio and the offerings that they have, both the traditional on-premise stuff, but the new cloud stuff that they have. So I'm looking forward to that and we'll see you in two weeks. Frank, thank you very much.

Frank Smith:

Thanks.

About the Ntiva Apple for Business Livestream

Ntiva’s Ben Greiner hosts the Ntiva Apple for Business livestream every other Tuesday from 12:00 to 12:30pm CT. These live events, presented by the Ntiva team of Apple experts, are sharply focused, easily digestible, and cover topics including the latest Apple/macOS/iOS technology updates, cybersecurity, data privacy, MDM and BYOD policies, and more! We take questions from the audience and share what's working—and not working—for us and others in the industry.

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