Ntiva Live: Apple for Business

2021 Apple Event and Zero Day Update

Episode Overview

In this episode, we discuss the exciting news from the 2021 Apple Event and cover the zero-day cybersecurity exploit on iOS 14.

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Episode Transcript - 2021 Apple Event and Zero Day Update

Ben Greiner:

Hi everyone. Today is Tuesday, September 21st, 2021. Live streaming from Chicago, I'm Ben Greiner, director of Apple technology at Ntiva, and with me is Ross Matsuda, our systems administrator focused on Apple technology. And today, we've got a lot to talk about today.

 

Apple News

We want to talk about Apple's announcements from last week at their event, and I also want to talk about some of the things they didn't talk about. In fact, every week now we're going to talk about some Apple news. And last week, Ross, Apple surprised us on, was it Monday afternoon?

Ross Matsuda:

I believe that is correct. They dropped around 12:00 PM Central.

 

Zero-Day Exploit

Ben Greiner:

Yeah, Mac iOS update that's described as a "zero day" exploit. And Apple has dropped these before, but for whatever reason the news media picked it up full-on this time, and so we were really, Tuesday morning, inundated with a ton of questions about this. So we created, let me share my screen.

So actually the company we work with, Addigy, I thought did a nice job of summarizing this "Zero Click Exploit" or "Apple Zero-Day" as they called it. And if you want to, you can read all about it. And we could probably spend a half hour talking just about this, but we also created an article, "How to Apply Critical Updates." And we kind of wrote this from the standpoint of, "We know this is going to happen more often.

It's happened in the past. It happened last week. It will happen again." And basically these are exploits or patches, security patches, that are super critical, and as soon as they come out it basically lets everyone know that this vulnerability exists and the only way to prevent it is to patch your devices. And in this case, Apple's patch required an update on basically all of their devices, including their Apple Watch. Right? There was no device spared, Ross, is that right? Maybe the Apple TV. The Apple TVs.

Ross Matsuda:

Yep, well said.

Ben Greiner:

And the challenge with this is we got a lot of requests from clients saying, "What are you guys doing about this?" Well what we're doing about it is what we always do, which is try to keep clients fully patched. It's just that is a much more complicated process than just doing it. And mainly because these updates, especially the one last week requires a restart and not just a quick restart, but was it like 10 minute restart Ross in some cases?

Ross Matsuda:

I would say, depending on the speed of your system, you've got a little bit of time to download the update, a little bit of time where your Mac sort of figures out what it wants to do with it, and then yeah, you can usually expect 10 to 15 minutes of a loading bar afterwards. It was a substantial patch.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. So you need to be prepared for it. And certainly never run something like that prior to going on a live stream because it will take longer than you think, and you'll be late for your meeting.

Ben Greiner:

So we put together this article, it's a public article, "How to Apply Critical Apple Updates." If you contacted us, we probably sent this to you. We also reached out to as many people as we could to let them know about this. And it really comes down to communication. We suggested that you share with your team this little snippet or email template about what to do, not just for their work devices but for their personal devices as well.

And then we layer on top of that for Mac OS something called "nudge" where a screen pops up. Do we have a link to it? Oh, here we go. A screen pops up and says your device requires a security update, or something to that effect, where we're often tweaking the language here, and it walks people through how to run that update. And if they ignore it, it gets more aggressive until they can't get rid of the dialog box. And for something critical like this, I think it's within a week, is that right, Ross, that they can not get rid of the dialog box?

Ross Matsuda:

Yeah. Generally speaking, more we're going to set these up because we know everyone's situation is different. We never want to strong arm a client into running these things at a really inconvenient time, but it's super important that they do get run. And we've generally found that having about a week lead time seems to be the right amount since 20 to 30 minutes of downtime at the end of the day, or during a lunch break, or off hours, whatever, is usually something that's pretty doable within seven days.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. And if you don't run though, and then if it's not critical, if there's an update that comes out that's not critical, I think we give them what a month to run that?

Ross Matsuda:

Give or take.

Ben Greiner:

Give or take, yeah.

Ross Matsuda:

In general, for most of these, we're still hoping to get compliance taken care of within about a week. But in order to, if something comes out that's really, really low maintenance, for example, like anything that doesn't involve an update or, excuse me, a restart, you're not going to see it. That we just push immediately, your computer takes care of it. [crosstalk 00:05:46]

Ben Greiner:

That's a good point because while I was preparing in the last half hour for this livestream, I noticed this showed up under a support menu, Mac OS Big Sur, this little update, what would that be called?

Ross Matsuda:

We call that "badging."

Ben Greiner:

Badging.

Ross Matsuda:

You're going to see a little badge in the top right corner that lets you know how many updates are detected. And right now, along with the release of iOS 15, and iPad iOS 15, Apple launched Safari 15. So you're going to see this, I believe in Big Sur. I believe it's also in Catalina. And this does not require a reboot. If you run this, just make sure you're running the newest version of Safari, that sort of lines up better with the new version launched with iOS.

I have heard reports that when you run this, if you have Safari open, it'll quit and reopen it because it's a big update to Safari. And if it closes your open tabs, you can go back up into your history and select the option to reopen your tabs from your last session to get right back to where you were before. This would be a great example of one of those updates that we will push silently.

Ben Greiner:

Right.

Ross Matsuda:

And like many Apple updates, even though this launched, I believe today or very recently, I usually take an extra day or two minimum to play with the update, to confer with other administrators in the community, just to make sure that we're all informed, no one discovers something real fishy that may cause any friction with users. So once we've made sure that everything looks great then that's we're going to start pushing that out to everybody else.

Ben Greiner:

Right. So just in summary, if you're a client of Ntiva, we will take care of these updates, although if you're, well, do you need to be an admin to run this update? I don't even.

Ross Matsuda:

I don't believe so.

Ben Greiner:

Okay.

Ross Matsuda:

We could spend a whole session talking about how administrative rights changes or updates and upgrades, especially when it comes to Apple silicon computers. But something like this, I believe it'll just let you right on through.

Ben Greiner:

So some people could run this on their own. If they don't do anything, we'll run it for them.

Ben Greiner:

But there are other things like these critical Apple updates that really are best run on your time. It's just you want to do it soon, so you want to get the message out, and then we're going to do as much as we can with the Nudge App to literally nudge people into doing this.

I also encourage all of our clients to follow along at home using Vision Bot. All of our primary contacts have access to Vision Bot. If you don't, contact us. And that's where you can basically see if any updates are available, who's fallen behind, who needs to run the updates, et cetera.

 

Apple Updates vs Apple Upgrades

Ben Greiner:

And speaking of updates, we run into this a lot, Ross, updates versus upgrades. And, you know, we've been pushing a lot of our clients to upgrade to Mac OS Big Sur. And there was some confusion, as there often is, because Apple, basically that little dialog box I showed you that I just quit looks like, let me go back there.

They have one interface for updates and upgrades. And that was not always the case. Upgrades used to be entirely separate, but at some point they put them all together. So sometimes we ask people to run updates and they try to run an upgrade. And that is a much different process and a different beast altogether.

Ben Greiner:

So I know it's confusing. And we do have an article that talks about upgrading versus updating your operating system. And Apple released that security patch for 10 15 and 11, and Monterey has hasn't shipped yet. But anything older than that, they did not touch, correct?

Ross Matsuda:

Yeah, that's correct. Generally speaking, you may see this term thrown around every now and then, but when it comes to what versions of Mac OS are supported, you'll hear "N minus two" and "minus two." That means that the software is being updated. Microsoft Office actually does the same thing for the current operating system, which is 10, and then minus two indicates, "and the two before it."

Ross Matsuda:

What made this bunch of patches from Apple so interesting last week, is that they did not post a patch for Mojave Mac OS 10 14. And that sort of indicated to us that we're expecting some more news on Monterey very soon. And when that happens, they'll chart that we have in this article is going to pretty much represent what we should expect Apple to push security updates for going forward.

And so if you do have computers running 10 14 in your environment, please reach out. We're happy to work with you to try to make sure that no major changes need to be made as far as your current software load outs, so that we can get you at least on Catalina, if not all the way up to Monterey, or, excuse me, Big Sur.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. And I want to also mention if you're trying to get to 10 15, or 11, and you're so far behind that you have to go several operating systems to get there, do it one at a time. Don't try to skip an OS upgrade, meaning don't go from 10 13 to 10 15, skipping 10 14. Is that fair to say Ross, or am I being super conservative in that statement?

Ross Matsuda:

You are not. There's a lot of chatter about this. This has been a longstanding question in the community and different versions sometimes behave better or worse in different scenarios. Generally we call this stair-stepping, right? so you're going to, if you were, for example, on Mojave today, we would have you stair-step up to Catalina, and then go to Big Sur, right? and it takes a little bit more time

Ben Greiner:

Success rate is a lot higher when we do that, right?

Ross Matsuda:

Yeah. It's worth it. It's only an extra hour and a half, maybe, for the user. And if it helps prevent problems, if it helps make the experience smoother, only at the expense of a little bit of extra time, it's absolutely going to be worth it.

Ben Greiner:

And that's another reason why you really don't want to fall too far behind with operating systems. I know sometimes we say, "Don't go there yet," but eventually we say, "Yes, go there." And people, I know, are busy, they don't have time, they don't do it, and then before you know it, they fall two, sometimes three, versions behind and because of security best practices today, you almost can't do that anymore.

You want to be running that most current version, or at the very least the current minus two, that would be as far as I would go. And because Apple's already hinting at these are the three, even though Monterey hasn't shipped yet, if you're running anything older than 10 15, please contact us so we can help you either upgrade, or if your machine doesn't qualify or is just super old, maybe consider getting a new machine.

 

Remote Control and Monitoring of Macs

Ben Greiner:

Okay. Let's see. Before I forget, I'm going to be speaking at an Addigy conference, well seminar series, on September 23rd. That's in a couple of days, Thursday. I'm a host. We're going to be talking to other MSPs about their current remote monitoring and management tool and how it compares to Addigy, which is what we use. So if you're interested in that, you can go to Addigy and register for that, or ping me and I can send you a link.

Ben Greiner:

Let's see. I have one more note, one more news I want to mention. I told you there was a lot of news, Ross. Let's see, last time we mentioned that we're auto-patching Zoom, because Zoom requires certain minimums now, and we sent out an email to our clients about that.

Ben Greiner:

And we have another upcoming change, that's just an FYI we want everyone to know about, and that is one of the tools that Addigy builds in to their remote control is called ScreenConnect, and it's been replaced by Splashtop. And if you could just give us a high level overview of what that means for our clients, I just want to get help get the word out any way I can.

Ross Matsuda:

Absolutely. So Connectwise, ScreenConnect and Splashtop have a tremendous amount of overlap. They're tools that we use so that when one of your employees is having some trouble with their Mac, we can join them on that machine, we can see what they see, control the cursor if we need to to help them work through or troubleshoot problems, things like that.

This change is just moving from one tool that does that suite of actions to another one. Exact same permissions, exact same level of access, or lack of level of access to those computers. And so, from a security standpoint that any devices attack surface is not being changed, just a different tool that ostensibly the same things.

Ross Matsuda:

What users are going to need to be aware of when this occurs, is that there's going to be a new app, and their applications folder just called Splashtop Streamer. It is going to do nothing and just sit there and wait. And so if anyone sees that you can just let your team know it's fine, it's expected, it's not a big deal.

And the first time that our team works with that user and needs to join them on their screen using Splashtop, they'll get a pop-up that says, "Hey, can you just give us permission to proceed?" And we need the user to very explicitly say, "Yes, I trust this," so that the technician can join them and see their computer. And once they've given that permission once, we're good to go for the future.

Ross Matsuda:

Some other great things about Splashtop, it's very, very transparent about letting you know when a user, when an administrator, is joining you for a session. There's a great old pop-up in the top corner that will appear when a session is live. So it's all very transparent. You can see Ben's brought it up here. There is the Splashtop Streamer.app file itself. And so starting on October 1st, well beg your pardon, starting the following Monday, I believe October 1st is a Friday and boy, do we love no change Fridays, users will start seeing this application.

It's again, it's just going to sit there, but to make sure that everyone feels informed and no one starts to worrying about, "Oh, where did this come from? Could this be a problem?" Just be aware that that will be present going forward. And then we have one month of overlap. And then in November, Connectwise control, little ScreenConnect integration will be deprecated. That'll be going away.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. What we've found is that those clients who have done a great job, and congratulations to you, of building security awareness, employees will see this and say, "What is this? What's going on?" And they'll rightfully be concerned. So just let them know ahead of time that this is normal. We expect it. Splashtop Streamer will show up and we'll send an email out as well to let our primary contacts know.

Ben Greiner:

I'm going to share a Keynote. And one of the things I learned recently, and you can see my Keynote here, I'm going to share it slightly differently in a minute, but this is Keynote. And there's a new play place slideshow in window option. And that comes in really handy for presentations like this. So if I stop sharing my screen, and I go back and share just that window, now it's full screen. Hopefully it's full screen. You can see it.

One of the challenges prior to Apple having that option was you would play, it would go full screen, but how many times has the presenter presented the wrong screen? Cause there's like a presenter notes and then there's the Keynote, and I, myself, have struggled with it. It was very confusing. So this is really nice. It just opens it a window. You share the window in any livestream app you're using, Zoom, Teams, RingCentral, whatever the case may be. And then you have your floating notes here as well.

 

The 2021 Apple Event: New iPhones, iPads, iOS and iPadOS Updates

Ben Greiner:

So I want to talk briefly about the events and yes, we're running out of time. So the event, overall Ross, new hardware that was faster, smarter, better, all that good stuff. And, and how many times can Apple say, "I'm so excited to show you this, and this is so much faster and better"? It's just playing repeat to be honest with you. But they're always is a lot of good stuff there. And to be honest, it's so much stuff. I haven't even had time to go through it all. Some of it is OS, some of it is hardware.

Ben Greiner:

So I'll just highlight a couple things here. One, Center Stage looks pretty cool. And that's just the idea, and once again, I may even have this wrong, but it adds some intelligence to the camera when you're presenting.

Do you remember, we had a camera, we have a camera, Huddly I think it is, and Huddly would follow you around the room and kind of like Zoom in if it was one person, zoom out if it was multiple people. It seems like Center Stage does some of that type of stuff.

Ross Matsuda:

I think a little bit of it primarily just for single presenter though. So the idea here is you've got your iPad set up, you propped it up on the kitchen table or something, and if you shift around a little bit, it's going to try to keep you roughly centered, right?

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. So obviously because of the pandemic, we're all doing a lot more of this type of interaction. And so the hardware and software is catching up to try to make it easier for everyone. I think that's great.

Ben Greiner:

Apple talked about 5G. I mean, I think 5G has been talked about for quite a while. So I don't know if that was a big news or not. I don't even know how well the networks are keeping up on offering 5G.

Ben Greiner:

One of the things that I was surprised they didn't talk more about, was Augmented Reality, because in their preview, I don't know if you know this, but if from your iPhone if you went to this page and clicked on this Apple logo right here, you could go into a Augmented Reality portal, which wasn't anything too special, you'd see birds flying around and here's some special music. But it would float, looked like it was floating in your room. And that kind of hinted at more Augmented Reality, but they really didn't talk about it other than I think in Maps, which I'll mention here in a minute.

Ben Greiner:

So, did you take anything away from the iPad announcement, Ross, that you want to share?

Ross Matsuda:

I'm not as aggressive an iPad user as I should be. In my alternate life when I'm not here at Ntiva doing Apple things, I'm working as theatrical director and an opera director. And over the years, the number of singers that I work with that carry around their scores entirely on iPads and iPad Pros has continually grown. And so anything that involves, like I said, they're always improving their battery life, they're improving Apple pencil integration, higher throughput through 5G.

I'm a huge fan of the WiFi 6 protocols. So it's great to see that's getting into the iOS devices. This stuff is all really exciting. And on a personal note, I had a huge soft spot for the iPad Mini. I've just always loved that model, and the fact that it got a lot of love during this refresh, it was really pleasing to me.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I mean, I do have an iPad with a keyboard, iPad Pro with a keyboard, and I do use it quite a bit more than I used to for reading, for looking at news, podcasts, even sometimes joining presentations like this. So yeah, if you haven't tried an iPad, I definitely recommend it. And certainly in business, anytime you have to carry around documentation, iPad is certainly the way to go these days. And I see so many of them at checkouts now when I go to buy something and it's just, that's the terminal, an iPad.

Ben Greiner:

Apple Watch. Do you have an Apple Watch, Ross?

Ross Matsuda:

I do. I love this little thing. I only scratched the surface of what it can do, but I feel like that's really common, right? Like any of us are only using 10 to 15% of what any of these computers are or other really powerful devices can do. But I really enjoy this and this update looks solid. I will not be using quite as much of the health features as they have available, and I'm glad they keep improving their sensor suite, but this. In particular, can be really life-changing for certain people. It's always great to keep tabs on what Apple is doing in this space.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I must admit I was hesitant when the Apple Watch first came out. I had not worn a watch for years, but I got one cause I wanted to see what it could do. And I got the original Apple Watch. And then now I have, I think this one's like, what generation is this? This was like seven. Yeah, series seven. So I think I have a four, maybe a fourth generation.

So it's missing some of the health features, but, and I'm thinking I might get this one as a replacement. But it is pretty amazing. I mean, I know personally two people that have gone to the hospital because the watch, it triggered something like, "You need to go get this checked out." I think that's super beneficial and amazing.

Ben Greiner:

Recently I was reading about how you can take this watch and wear it at night to track your sleep. I had no idea my own watch could do something similar, not to the level that the new ones can. But I had always just put mine, charged it, figured I'd charge it all night.

And then what, after reading this article, I started just charging it as I get ready for bed and charging it as I get up in the morning to take a shower, and I started wearing it to bed. And in the morning it tells me my lowest heart rate, my highest heart rate, it shows me when I was asleep, when I was tossing and turning. And what can I do with that data, Ross? I'm not quite sure, but it is pretty interesting. Yeah.

Ross Matsuda:

I'll give that a spin. I know that there, as it shows on page, but fast charging has been a big thing for Apple and it makes sense that they want to have a solution for that to try to encourage people to use the sleep tracking functionality because I feel like we're all used to the idea. End of the day, plug all your things in, go to sleep.

Ben Greiner:

Right.

Ross Matsuda:

But they have explicitly unplugging something before you go to sleep [inaudible 00:24:30] behavioral change.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I mean, I was actually shocked that my old, out of warranty, watch could still fast charge. And then, so I pretty much have been wearing it for the past week, day and night, and just fast charging it periodically in the morning and evening, and it works great. So yeah, definitely sometimes you need those mind, change the way you think about things for sure.

Ben Greiner:

And of course, bigger screen. I don't know how much bigger the screens can get at a certain point on your wrist. At least not in my little thin little wrist.

Ben Greiner:

But Apple Fitness. They talked about Apple Fitness. You know, I think it's a great concept. I personally don't use it. Have you used it, Ross?

Ross Matsuda:

No, no. I absolutely see the value in it and especially anyone who's hesitant to return to a gym space. A lot of great stuff here, but I don't have experience with it.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I might try the guided meditation. I've been trying to get more into breathing exercises. So I might try that. But I did get Apple Fitness Plus when I switched to Apple One, I think I mentioned that last time. Same amount of money, more features. So I should definitely check this out.

Ben Greiner:

Let's see. The big announcement for everyone was the iPhones. And once again, better, bigger, faster. I saw some commentary where there wasn't a lot of comparison between the old previous version of iPhone 12 and iPhone 13, implying that there wasn't that big of a power boost, but they did talk about the cinematic mode, which you know, it's just incredible what you can do from a recording perspective, a video recording perspective on the phones today.

And some of the videos they demoed, granted created by professional videographers, but the fact that they did it with an iPhone is just like, I can't believe it. I think about when I was a kid and the technology we had then compared to what kids have today, it's unbelievable.

Ben Greiner:

Photographic styles look pretty interesting. I enjoy photography. I just had a discussion the other day. At a certain point, I actually prefer the smaller phones because I just want to reference things occasionally, put it in my pocket.

If I really want to sit down and read, I'll go to my iPad or my computer. But if I want the better camera, I need to go to iPhone 13, not the iPhone, what do they call it, the iPhone mini? Is that what they call it, Ross?

Ross Matsuda:

I don't remember the exact terminology, but I know that the there's the 13 and then there's the 13 Pro. And when you see these photos, all of these photos are of the 13 Pro where you've got the three camera set up instead of just the two lens set up. And there's, if you're curious about this stuff, any of your favorite tech bloggers are going to have comparisons and buyer's guides, what are the main differences between a 13 and 13 Pro?

Ross Matsuda:

And I'm glad that they actually called it out on this page here. It's weird that I like it, but I've, I really liked LIDAR. It's a really fascinating technology. It's an interesting sensor that's going to be super helpful for Augmented Reality. And right now it's only in the Pro models. I was hoping this would be the generation that put it on all of them, but not quite yet.

But yeah, take a look. They'll walk you through the differences between the functional changes, between the two and the three cameras on each of the devices, the slight changes in battery life, changes in build materials, presence or not at the LIDAR sensor, things like that.

Ben Greiner:

You know, I get a lot of people because I'm in this business, I'm sure you do as well, Ross, they say, "Hey, you're an Apple guy. Which iPhone should I get? Or iPad or whatever?" And I'm not, I cannot keep up on the tech specs. Plus even if I could, everyone's use case is different. So anytime that happens, I pretty much say, "Well, let's sit down and talk about what you want. Let's go to Apple's website, look at all the options, compare what you need, compare what's important to you."

Ben Greiner:

And then I think back to the day when Steve Jobs returned to Apple in the late nineties, and he took a hundred Apple products, I'm exaggerating, but a hundred Apple products and he brought them down to four, which was a laptop and desktop for consumers, laptop and desktop for professionals. That was it.

That was easy. And Apple's kind of gotten, it's creeped up to where they have a lot of products now, and they don't seem to, if I go to the, I'll do it later, but Apple's webpage, if you go to their models, they don't, just because they introduced a new model, doesn't mean they discontinue the old model. Maybe that just, it becomes the old or a new price point.

Ben Greiner:

So it's a challenge. And when you're ready to buy, talk to somebody, talk to us if you're a client, we can certainly help you. But yeah, there's certainly not a one size fits all for any of this stuff. And I guess it's great that we have options.

Ben Greiner:

Let's see. Yeah. I saw something totally ridiculous when I was looking for images, or doing some research for this Ross, you might have seen it in Teams. Somebody created a fake, I'm going to share my screen again. Apparently the iPhone is such a status symbol these days that, I can't get to this link. I'm going to get to it. I'm going to it. I guess I have to, okay, here, I'm going to stop this.

Ben Greiner:

So someone created this sticker to make your iPhone with two cameras look like it has three cameras. So yes, for two dollars and 19 cents, up to $4.50, I don't know why the price discrepancy, you too can fool your friends into them thinking that you have a better iPhone than you do. I have no idea why that is, but I thought that was funny. So I wanted to share it.

Ben Greiner:

Let's see. Let's get back. So, oh, I did have a couple more things. Let me just show you this. I won't re-share my screen again, but what I like about iOS 15. we didn't get to talk about, about iOS 15. So iOS 15, that's something we can all take advantage of with our existing equipment, unless you have something really old. I applied it.

It came out yesterday. I applied it first to my iPad because I figured if that broke, I didn't, I didn't absolutely need it. And then I applied it to my phone, even though I barely use it as a phone. And then I applied it to my Apple TV. Oh, and then I applied it to my watch this morning because you have to update your phone before you can update your Apple Watch.

Ben Greiner:

And I haven't dove into all this yet, but I really liked the idea of having more control over a do not disturb. Do not disturb was kind of all or nothing. Either it was on or off. And now they give you a lot more options. So I need time to explore that, but I think that's really interesting.

Ben Greiner:

And then I'm kind of curious about the Live Text, which I have not tried yet, but the idea that you can point your phone at something and it can see the text and interpret it, and you can click on it and copy and paste it and things like that.

Ben Greiner:

And the last thing, going back to Augmented Reality, I said I was going to talk about this again, is I think this, I haven't tried it, but this is kind of interesting. The idea that it is you're walking through a street, back in the day when I used to leave my house, I would use Apple Maps. I haven't used it much recently, but you can hold it up and kind of see the Augmented Reality of where to turn and, have you ever to find a street sign?

And you're like, "I can't find where...there's no street sign here, like in the real world." So I assume in Apple Maps, the street sign, like it says here, Davis Street would just appear. And people are of course hinting at maybe this is also the precursor to Apple glasses, where we could wear them and see things like this. And certainly, certainly interesting.

Ben Greiner:

I know we're, we're technically out of time. Was there anything else you wanted to add, Ross, about the announcements last week?

Ross Matsuda:

No, I think that's really the most of it. Just answered a quick question in chat, which was great, about what iOS 15 system requirements are. And generally speaking, if you've got an iPhone later than iPhone 5, you're probably going to be fine.

Please do note then, and Apple did call this out separately, certain advanced imaging features like live texts and some things like that may not be available for devices older than the iPhone X and XS. So be aware. That being said, generally speaking, if your device supports it, we tend to recommend the upgrade, if for no other reason then you're always going to be sure that you're getting the most up-to-date security patches and fixes as those go forward.

Ross Matsuda:

As far as these updates last week, yeah the security patch for 10 15, 7, Catalina has been out in the wild. 11.6, the new version of Big Surs, going out as well. We'll be doing everything we can to make sure that your Mac users that are enrolled in Addigy are getting those nudges to get those updates done.

And we do always encourage reaching out to your teams about the updates for iOS, even on their personal devices. It's great to just know that if it's touching any of your information, if it's accessing company email, there's no harm in it. There's no harm in making sure everyone's got these patches taken care of.

Ben Greiner:

Yeah. I see you posted a link here. So here's iOS 15 system requirements. And I wanted to point out that, where do you go? Here. if you go to apple.com/newsroom, if you want to get the news about all of these updates directly from Apple as opposed to interpreted by Wired magazine or any number of outlets, this is a nice place. Apple continually updates this page and they have a lot of great information.

Ben Greiner:

So that's everything we wanted to talk about today. I did want to mention I'm putting together a schedule, as promised, I said the last two weeks ago I would have a schedule. And although I haven't documented this publicly yet, we have some exciting things coming up. Ross, you're going to hear these for the first time and they're going to involve you, but I want to talk about account creation, authentication, and of course, Addigy identity.

I want to talk about that. I want to talk about device and app management. We get a lot of questions about how to manage apps and devices. Security planning, talking about that. Employee resources for self-service, we're going to have a live stream dedicated to that. And how to protect devices, how to automate, all these things are things that we do every day, but there's a lot that goes into it. And a lot of people have questions about them and I want to get the word out there.

Ben Greiner:

Anyone who's listening, if you have ideas that you want to hear, please let me know. And I also want to point out that if you do go to Ntiva.com, under resources, Apple technology livestreams, here's the page. We have our previous recordings, and we discovered an issue where you're supposed to click "view past live streams," which for some reason it's not centered on my page, but you're supposed to click on that and see something like this: a page with the transcript.

We need to fix that because right now it takes you to the YouTube page. But what we did do recently, if you view the playlist, is we gave the titles of proper identifiers so you can quickly find things, and a title card to also help. So if you're looking for the live stream with Thomas Reed at Malwarebytes, much easier to find. Or Jason Dettbarn from Addigy or Paul Bowden from Microsoft.

Ben Greiner:

And by the way, Paul mentioned that something we asked for in that livestream is going to be implemented in the next version of Outlook, which if you're on the pre-release you may already have it. And if you're not, it comes out in October. We can talk about that when it does come out. We'll talk more about that.

In fact, maybe we'll have a whole livestream on Outlook for Mac cause I know we get a lot of questions about that and there's the online version, there's the desktop, and there's actually two desktop versions now, the old and the new. And I just switched to the new and I'm starting to really enjoy it.

Ben Greiner:

So that's all for now. I know we went over. We'll see you in two weeks and we'll get that schedule published. Thanks everyone. Bye.

 

About the Ntiva Apple for Business Livestream

Ntiva’s Ben Greiner and Chad Calease host the Ntiva Apple for Business livestream every other Tuesday from 12:00 to 12:30pm CT. These live events, presented by the Ntiva team of Apple experts, are sharply focused, easily digestible, and cover topics including the latest Apple/macOS/iOS technology updates, cybersecurity, data privacy, MDM and BYOD policies, and more! We take questions from the audience and share what's working—and not working—for us and others in the industry.

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